Pulitzer winner Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland is one of five finalists, alongside two fiction debuts, in contention for $50,000 award: The Guardian

From the story of a bomb blast in the heart of Karachi to a portrait of postwar Sri Lanka, the shortlist for the DSC prize for South Asian literature pits acclaimed authors including Kamila Shamsie and Jhumpa Lahiri against two debut novelists.

The $50,000 (£32,000) award is given to a writer of any nationality writing about South Asia and its people, with five writers on the shortlist this year.

Shamsie and Lahiri are joined on the 2015 DSC shortlist by Romesh Gunesekera, who was shortlisted for the Booker prize in 1994 for Reef, and for debuts from first-time novelists Bilal Tanweer and Shamsur Rahman Faruqi.

Hailed as the new Jhumpa Lahiri, Jacob soars with a voice entirely her own, less bleak and more vibrant: Neha Bhatt in The Outlook

dancing_coverDeath, in fact, many deaths, loom large over Mira Jacob’s debut novel The Sleepwal­ker’s Guide To Dancing. Yet, the novel never feels weighed down by its dark moments, in Jacob’s sure hand, the narrative moves soft as breeze. The novel opens with a prologue where a mother complains to her daughter about her father’s latest shenanigans, affectionately, of course, and not without dollops of wry humour. It’s enough to pull you into their story, buoyant with everyday conversations that are comic, tragic, and often both.

Indian American author Jhumpa Lahiri will join the faculty of Princeton University next month, as a professor of creative writing at the esteemed Ivy League institution.

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412Lahiri was named alongside 16 other individuals as the university’s newest faculty members, of which four, including Lahiri, will become “full professors”; the other 13 were given assistant professor positions at Princeton. As a professor of creative writing, Lahiri will be part of the school’s Lewis Center for the Arts, and will officially begin work on July 1.

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412First-time Irish novelist Eimear McBride beat five other authors including Pulitzer Prize winning Indian American writer Jhumpa Lahiri to win this year’s Baileys Prize, the UK’s only annual book award for fiction written by a woman.

McBride’s debut A Girl is a Half-formed Thing tells the story of a young woman’s relationship with her brother and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumour.

Today’s English literature reflects ethnic diversity and it’s not just the current fashion: Kate Williams in Al Jazeera

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412In early April, the Baileys Prize shortlist for fiction by women was announced. Although it is a UK-based prize, there are no authors who are sole citizens of the UK on the shortlist: Donna Tartt is American, Hannah Kent is Australian, Audrey Magee and Eimear McBride are Irish, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is from Nigeria and Jhumpa Lahiri holds both US and British citizenships.

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412Pulitzer Prize-winning Indian American novelist Jhumpa Lahiri’s “Lowland” has been shortlisted for this year’s Baileys Prize, the UK’s only annual book award for fiction written by a woman.

“The Lowland”, which is about the lives of brothers Subhash and Udayan, their choices and their fate, was described by Helen Fraser, Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2014 Chair, as “Moving and vivid, an unforgettable story of two brothers and the different paths they take. A novel about how political passion can destroy lives.”

Two prizewinning writers pay tribute to a unique author who embraced darkness and compassion as well as humour and light: The Guardian

mavis_gallantJhumpa Lahiri on Gallant: I discovered Mavis Gallant thanks to a writer friend in the mid-90s when I was just starting out writing short stories. I felt she had taken the form above and beyond what I thought it could do. She turned it on its head. I felt a great freedom when reading her, because even though her work is mainly short stories, they are their own genre in a way; they are so much richer, so much denser than so many novels. If you just read the opening two pages of some of her stories you are inundated with details, material, interior life, coming at full throttle, yet it is all very clear and one is able to follow and enter into these worlds that she creates.