‘Bridget Jones’s Diary’ meets ‘The Diary of a Social Butterfly’ in this comedy of manners: Mint

“It’s Karachi. It’s where life and love come to die. It has nothing,” cries Ayesha, the narrator of Saba Imtiaz’s first novel, Karachi, You’re Killing Me!, in mock-despair. Much to her surprise—though the reader can see it coming all along—Ayesha not only survives the city but also finds love, if in an unlikely man, by the end of the book.

A fast-paced novel, based on the kidnapping of an American journalist in Karachi: Mint

The most engaging examples of crime fiction show you not only how their protagonist’s mind works, but also how the city they are operating in works: the Edinburgh of John Rebus, the various Italian cities of Aurelio Zen, the Bangkok of Sonchai Jitpleecheep. With his debut novel The Prisoner, Omar Shahid Hamid lets the reader see through the eyes of deputy superintendent Constantine D’Souza of Karachi’s Central Prison and also get an insight into the city.

The Children’s Literature Festival (CLF) that used to be a part of the Karachi Literature Festival has now grown up into a separate entity: The Tribune

This year’s 11th CLF will be held on February 21 and February 22 at the Arts Council of Pakistan Karachi, announced Oxford University Press (OUP) director Ameena Saiyid at a press conference on Saturday.

“We are a bit scared about the number of students attending the festival as a school contacted me and told they will be bringing around 1,000 students to the festival,” admitted CLF director Rumania Hussain. “I hope the turn out will help the children’s festival establish itself on the same pattern as KLF.”

The Karachi Literature Festival inaugurated in 2010 and in five years has become the leading cultural event in Pakistan: The Tribune

A Parsi, a Bohri and I get into a conversation about the on-going TTP talks. The Parsi talks about the possibility of growing a beard. Since I am rather addicted to my look I joke about declaring myself a dhimmi (non-Muslims of an Islamic state) and paying jizya (tax). We laugh because we can and because we feel liberated enough to joke about it. Yes, it’s the KLF, the dark humour is perfectly acceptable and you naturally feel slightly freer when you have just heard a speech by Mahatma Gandhi’s grandson.