Tag Archives: immigrant fiction

Short Story: The Part-Time Indian by Namrata Shailendra Singh

She stares idly into the distance, an empty ceramic tumbler in front of her.

“The beach there is different…in my country.” She says lost in the reverie of the waves. 

Did she say bitch to me? No, No, it’s the beach, the beach of Mexico. I remind myself of the Mexican Spanish accent. People’s vowels and consonants, my own diction is my Achilles heel even after years of mac and cheese.  Why would she call her life-coach a bitch? Calming my heart, I try to concentrate. Usually, I am the focussed type, I can come to the point easily. A seasoned counselor,  I can anticipate in the first five minutes the story which has got the weary heart to my doorsteps.

Listening is my profession, my bread and peanut butter and what they call in Japan- the Ikigai. Okay, close to Ikigai.  Occasionally I get jolted, dismayed by a story, as and when a 15-year-old girl talked about being drugged at a party at a friend’s house and later found herself in the morning without clothes on her body.  She was suffering from herpes apart from the guilt that she was responsible for being sexually assaulted. I was worried for my teenage daughter.

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Hanif Kureishi: The migrant has no face, status or story

Immigration has become a prison of cliche in Europe: The Guardian

Hanif KureishiThe immigrant has become a contemporary passion in Europe, the vacant point around which ideals clash. Easily available as a token, existing everywhere and nowhere, he is talked about constantly. But in the current public conversation, this figure has not only migrated from one country to another, he has migrated from reality to the collective imagination where he has been transformed into a terrible fiction. Read more

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Italian obsession

JhumpaAccording to this interview in the New York Times, the author of the forthcoming novel “The Lowland” is into many things Italian

Jhumpa Lahiri say: “Almost all the books I have on my shelves now are in Italian. I have been reading predominantly in Italian for over a year. I read more slowly as a result. But also more carefully, less passively.”

“I’m reading the poems of Patrizia Cavalli, whom I’ve had the great pleasure of meeting in Rome. I adore her personally and I love her poems.”

“I’m also reading the letters of Cesare Pavese and Pasolini’s “Teorema,” which was conceived both as a novel and a film.”

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