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Urdu festival Jashn-e-Rekhta begins in Delhi

By Supriya Sharma

In the season of spring and literary festivals, this perhaps is the sweetest offering and the biggest of its kind. The third edition of Urdu festival Jashn-e-Rekhta (JeR) opened this Friday and over the weekend, scholars, writers, poets, singers, artists and admirers of the language will gather at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts in Delhi to celebrate Urdu in all its forms. The roster of the two-and-a-half-day festival includes panel discussions, dastangoi (storytelling) sessions, mushairas, qawwalis, ghazals, baitbaazi, street plays – to be held simultaneously across four venues – as well as a book exhibition, a calligraphy workshop, the Urdu Bazaar (presenting the antiquities and handicrafts of Old Delhi), a food festival, and more.

“This year, we’re trying to revive baitbaazi, which is like antakshari but with Urdu poetry, by showcasing it at the bigger venue, the stage lawn,” explains Sanjiv Saraf, festival director and founder of the Rekhta Foundation. “We’re also having a number of mushairas this year: a grand mushaira, one for women poets, one for the youth and another focusing on humour and satire.”

The festival will host over a 100 eminent speakers from the world of cinema, arts and culture, including lyricist-poet Gulzar, screenwriter and playwright Javed Siddiqui, adman and lyricist Prasoon Joshi, Urdu poet Wasim Barelvi, actor-director Saurabh Shukla, actor Nadira Babbar, journalist Saeed Naqvi, food critic and historian Pushpesh Pant, actor Sharmila Tagore, advocate-littérateur Saif Mahmood, poet-politician Kumar Vishwas and actor-radio host Annu Kapoor. Read more

Source: Hindustan Times

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Delhi gears up for its homegrown lit fest

By Srija Naskar

Delhi’s very own literature festival is being organised from 10-12 February, 2017,  at one of the most prominent and centrally-located venues here — the Dilli Haat, opposite INA Market. Organised with the objective of promoting arts and literature, and to provide a platform to young authors and publishers, the first chapter of the Delhi Literature Festival (DLF)was inaugurated in 2013 by the then Chief Minister, Sheila Dikshit. Since then, the last four editions have seen active participation from high-profile politicians, as well as award-winning authors, diplomats, publishers, artists, journalists, bloggers, and last but not least the thousands of book lovers of this city.

DLF 2017 will witness talks and discussions by eminent authors, poets and bureaucrats — including Ashok Vajpayee, Munawwar Rana, Dr. Alexander Evans, Navtej Sarna, Vikas Swaroop, Baldeo Bhai Sharma, Christopher Doyle, Ashok Chakradhar, Sanjaya Baru, Kumar Vishwas, William Dalrymple, Omair Ahmad, Saba Naqvi, Avirook Sen, Taslima Nasreen and many others from within India and abroad. The itinerary involves three days of panel discussions, book launches, poetry recitations, book readings and interactions with eminent authors, writers and bloggers. Read more

Source: Sunday Guardian Live


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India: Lives of renowned Hindi poets brought alive with ‘Mahakavi’ on ABP News from 5th Nov

ABP News is launching its all new of its kind primetime show “Mahakavi” from 5 November. ABP News will pay tribute to legendary Indian poets who have made a prominent place for Hindi poetry in the world of literature through its all new one of its kind show ‘MAHAKAVI’. Mahakavi is an effort to bring richness of literary heritage on Indian Television for the 1st time ever.

The programme will be anchored by Kumar Vishwas.

Hindi Poetry is the oldest form of literature and has a rich written and oral tradition. Through times, we have learnt that poetry is not just meant for entertainment in royal courts but carry the strength to move mountains, wage wars and much more. India has a legacy of poets renowned across the globe. Their contributions range in various genres like Shringar (love), Karun (pathos), Veer (heroic), Hasya (comic) amongst many. Some of the outstanding works were commonly recited during Indian independence movements spreading valour and courage. Read more