Tag Archives: The Satanic Verses

Major new novel from Salman Rushdie to be published this year

Salman_RushdiePenguin Random House India to publish a new novel by Salman Rushdie, The Golden House, in September 2017

Simultaneous publication: Penguin Random House India, Random House US, Jonathan Cape UK, and Penguin Random House Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.

Forthcoming from Salman Rushdie is a breathtaking new novel on a sprawling canvas. A modern-day thriller, it follows a mysteriously wealthy family from Bombay that is desperately seeking to forget the tragedy they left behind as they feverishly reinvent themselves in New York City. Copiously detailed, sumptuously inventive, brimming with all the razzle-dazzle that imbues his fiction with the lush ambience of a fable, The Golden House is about where we were before 26/11, where we are today and how we got here. Here is a book that asks us – in a post-truth world – if facts and authenticity are necessarily the same thing, while never ceasing to be both resonant and entertaining.

Meru Gokhale, Editor-in-Chief, Literary Publishing, at Penguin Random House India, who acquired Indian subcontinent rights from The Wylie Agency says, “This is Salman Rushdie at his finest. The Golden House is a masterclass on the confusing world we have brought upon ourselves. The book dissects the cultural and political vacuum in which a generation – whose frame of reference for globalization has increasingly been coloured by conflict – must perform an intense balancing act. It is a terrific story, told at every step of the way with originality and nimble, impeccable plotting.”

Sir Salman Rushdie is the multi-award winning author of twelve previous novels: Midnight’s Children which won the Booker Prize (1981) and the Best of the Booker Prize (2008), Grimus, Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor’s Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, Shalimar the Clown, Luka and the Fire of Life, The Enchantress of Florence and his recent Two Years, Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights. His memoir, Joseph Anton, published in 2012, became an acclaimed bestseller, praised as “the finest memoir […] in many a year” (The Washington Post). He has also published one collection of short stories, East, West, and three works of non-fiction: The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991 and Step Across This Line. Rushdie has also co-edited two anthologies, Mirrorwork and Best American Short Stories 2008. His books have been translated into over forty languages. He is a former president of American PEN.

Source: Penguin India

 

Salman Rushdie says he may not have survived if The Satanic Verses had been published today

Author Salman Rushdie believes he may not have survived if he had published his controversial The Satanic Verses today due to the internet now making death threats common place: The Telegraph

Salman RushdieSalman Rushdie may not have survived if he published his controversial The Satanic Verses today, because the febrile world of the internet has made death threats commonplace, the author has said.

Rushdie, who was placed under a fatwa in 1989 in response to the book, said the web has made hostility grow “exponentially”, with serious threats becoming “everyday”.

Read more

Why Pakistanis are talking about Salman Rushdie again

Malik Siraj Akbar in The Huffington Post

malalaSalman Rushdie and his controversial 1988 novel The Satanic Verses have ignited a series of fresh zealous discussions in Pakistan, a country known for its love for conspiracy theories and controversies. We vividly remember books, such as The Satanic Verses and movies like The Innocence of Muslims that sparked violent protests in Pakistan, as well as in many other Islamic countries, where the Muslims insisted that the book and the movie had separately insulted Prophet Muhammad.

Pakistan’s stringent blasphemy laws recommend the death sentence for anyone who insults Muhammad. Read more

Amid ‘Satanic’ Panic, One ’80s Teen Discovered Rushdie’s Charms

Salman_RushdieSCOTT HUTCHINS on discovering Salman Rushdie: NPR

In 1980s Arkansas, one concern trumped all others: Satan. He whispered backwards on our rock albums. He possessed otherwise good people’s bodies and brought them to sin. His worshippers — it was honestly believed and confidently proclaimed — lived among us.

So when my stepmother opened our town’s first bookstore I was amazed by one book in particular: an infernal red and black volume called The Satanic Verses. Read more