Tag Archives: Lifelines

Essay: My Cup of Tea by Sekhar Banerjee

It was a Wednesday evening. We did not have power since the Amphan, a cyclone of sinister proportions, had made a landfall on Tuesday afternoon lashing Calcutta with ferocious wind and rain in the middle of a lockdown. The part of Calcutta where we live had the look of a cornfield ravaged by a hoard of rogue elephants – thousands of trees uprooted, boundary walls collapsed, and we did not have electricity for the previous 24 hours. It was not at all an appropriate time to upload photos of tea cups on social media and snobbishly announce the elevated status that had been accorded to an old brew on a sleepy mobile phone tangled with a power bank. But I could not resist the temptation to share the breaking news – ‘The United Nations recognizes the importance of one of the oldest brews on earth and declares May 21 as World Tea Day. Cheers!’ It was instinctive. Like itching.

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Anecdotes from Bangladesh

lifelinesAyesha Tabassum interviews Farah Ghuznavi in The Bangalore Mirror

Lifelines, an anthology edited by Farah Ghuznavi, looks at stories from contemporary Bangladesh. The editor shares her experiences of being on the other side of the writing process

What defines the lives of a people in a country in South Asia? Is it only turmoil, poverty and attempts at development? In Lifelines , an anthology of short stories edited by Farah Ghuznavi, acclaimed short story writer, the reader gets an all encompassing picture of the people of Bangladesh. From a 10-year-old’s quest to get her parents’ attention to a middle-aged man’s hunt for his love from younger days, every story draws an episode from the lives of people who represent the real Bangladeshi.

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