Tag Archives: the Congress

India: Congress to Publish Reader-Friendly Literature on Jawahar Lal Nehru

Over the past few months, the Congress party has often accused the Modi government of “trying to erase” Nehruvian legacy from the Indian mind space.

Now, in an attempt to counter the Modi government, the Congress party has decided to publish reading material on Nehru’s life and works in a reader-friendly easy language.

This is part of the Congress’ plan to hold a Big Bang event to conclude the 125th birth anniversary celebrations that the party started last November. Read more

Excerpts: Muslim Politics in Bihar: Changing Contours by Mohammad Sajjad

BiharMohammad Sajjad, Muslim Politics in Bihar: Changing Contours

Routledge, London/New Delhi, 2014

This book is a study of participation of the Muslim communities, with their intra-community socio-economic stratifications, in the politics of India’s eastern province, Bihar, during colonial and post-independence period. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, in the resistance against the Bengali hegemony, the Urban educated middle class of Muslims along with their Hindu counterparts, more specifically the Kayasthas (the Hindu community of scribes), organized themselves along the lines of ‘regional patriotism’ or ‘subordinate nationalism’ and succeeded in creating province of Bihar out of the Bengal in 1912. The Congress made its significant headway in Bihar only after that. Gandhiji’s intervention (1917) in the Champaran Satyagraha (which had intermittently been manifesting since the 1860s under the leadership of local intelligentsia, and had re-intensified since 1907), and the subsequent Khilafat-Non Cooperation Movements (1920-22) galvanized the Bihar people in anti-colonial popular struggle once again, after the movement of 1857. In all these movements including the movements/initiatives for modern education in the nineteenth century, Muslims had considerable share. Subsequently, with the growing political strength of the Congress in the 1920s, rural landed elites like the Rajputs and Bhumihars started dominating the Congress as also in the structures of power like the local bodies created by the colonial state in accordance with the Act of 1919. It started creating misgivings among the increasingly politicized communities of Muslims about the Congress. This is also to be understood that from the 1930s onwards the Congress was under pressure from the landed elites because of which it had started developing sour relations with the emerging rural forces and the grievances of the intermediate castes; the Kisan movement, the Triveni Sangh, the Harijan assertion, the tribal movements, etc., had constant tension with the Congress. Read more

Nothing but the Truth with Karan Thapar: Sanjaya Baru on his book ‘Accidental Prime Minister’

Sanjaya Baru’s book on Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, ‘Accidental Prime Minister’, has evoked extreme reactions ranging from disbelief to criticism bordering on vitriol. While the Congress has dismissed Sanjaya Baru’s book ‘The Accidental Prime Minister’ as a work of fiction, there are those who feel that the book gives more than just a fleeting glimpse into the turbulent world of the PM. In this exclusive interview, Sanjaya Baru opens up about how he lost his respect for Manmohan, whom he had once looked upon as a mentor, how Sonia became the centre of power and of course, how the book is a defence of the Prime Minister.