Pritam Kaushik in The Huffington Post

Jaipur Literary Festival (JLF) has none other than the celebrated British author William Dalrymple for its founding father who organized it first in 2006, has seen a lot of success in terms of being replicated in many parts of the world, including several states and metros within Indian nation.

William Dalrymple’s colourful history of the first British campaign in Afghanistan draws effective parallels with recent events: Ian Thomson in The Guardian

return of a kingKenneth Williams, with his nasal, camp-cockney inflections, made a very good Khasi of Kalabar in Carry On Up the Khyber. The film, shot in 1968 in north Wales, satirised British imperial ambitions in Afghanistan and the Kingdom of Kabul (now Pakistan). Sir Sidney Ruff-Diamond and his posh cor blimey cohorts find themselves out of their depth amid tribal bloodletting and jihadi mayhem. Qur’anic ideals of mercy are not shown the 3rd Foot and Mouth Regiment as they move up the Khyber.

A literary figure, a writer creates his/her masterpieces for readers. It’s a rarity that a reader is blessed enough to meet the writer he likes in person. A reader is related to a writer through the latter’s words, imagination s/he uses in his writings. The meeting in person was considered more of a fantasy and a dramatised dream in olden days. But now things have changed, literature has also seen an advancement and progress. One of the many examples of that can be Literary Festivals organised globally.

william_dalrympleWilliam Dalrymple’s duck-billed smartphone is a lot like the Jaipur Literature Festival that he co-directs: a clever core with a showy outer shell of fun.

The author and historian carries the bright-yellow-phone between venues of probably the world’s largest free literature festival as he moderates sessions on his beloved nonfiction, explains to young acolytes how he goes about his meticulous historical research, and thanks authors for attending.

With an extensive line-up of 139 speakers, this year’s festival is set to make waves in Indian literature scene: DNA

Reza Aslan
Reza Aslan

The extensive list of speakers at the festival this year includes a motley crew of award- winning writers and academics from across the globe. From Pulitzers to Man Bookers— the “somebodies” of the art and culture world, will all be there.

Renowned brands in literature and art who have confirmed their participation include writers Jhumpa Lahiri, Jerry Pinto, Amish Tripathi; actor Rupert Everett, actor and theatre personality Irrfan Khan, and sports personality Mar Kom to name a few.

Writer William Dalrymple recounts the difficulties he faced over the years in Jaipur lit fest at BLF.

Dalrymple bristled at a question put to him asking if the controversies at JLF had been planted by the organisers themselves to gain attention. In fact, they had done their best to avoid controversy last year by leaving out Salman Rushdie’s name from the schedule of speakers for the festival. But Rushdie would have none of that: “I don’t want to be like a white rabbit coming out a hat. So put out my name in the list,” he told Dalrymple.