Tag Archives: Urdu

Urdu literature tops youngsters reading preferences

A one day book fair organized by Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology (SZABIST) Islamabad campus uncovered interesting trends relative to book reading among young generation: students seem very much interested in reading, its only the technological revolution that has apparently distance them from books.

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Review: The secular nationalism of Urdu by Kavita Saraswathi Datla

UrdubookWithout a doubt Datla’s book is a tremendous historiographical effort toward setting the record straight on the Muslim contribution to India’s secular future, writes A Fazlur Rehman in The Hindu.

The possibility of Urdu being a secular language that could unite India’s diverse communities may come as a surprise to many because of the mistaken belief that it is a “Muslim language.” But an attempt to forge a “common secular future” for Indian citizens through Urdu was indeed made in the 19th century in the princely state of Hyderabad. Read more

This too is Pakistani Literature

Fahmida Riaz on the wordless apartheid practiced against progressive literature in Pakistan in The Dawn

In Pakistani literature, an undeclared, wordless apartheid has been practiced against progressive literature, or what is known the world over as engaged literature. Consequently, in most books of literary criticism, references to engaged literature are conspicuous by their absence, unless a work is open to some other interpretation such as lyricism, imagism, surrealism or even structuralism, a comparatively new entrant in the jargon of our Urdu literati.

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Farman Fatehpuri, a researcher and linguist, passes away at 87

I had my first encounter with Farman Fatehpuri as a student at Karachi University in 1971. I had gone to Urdu department to see Dr Abul Lais Siddiqui who introduced me to Farman Sahib. Later, once in professional life, I had many other meetings with him mostly at the office of one of his close friends, Syed Zahid Ali, the publisher of theWeekly Current, Karachi. I always found him a lively man at ease with himself who showed no inhibitions while in the company of people much younger to him.

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‘Like some English woman wearing Indian dress’: Shamsur Rahman Faruqi

shamsur RahmanIndia’s literary establishment is abuzz about the recently published novel “The Mirror of Beauty,” a 984-page fictional account about the life and times of Wazir Khanam, the mother of the famed Urdu poet Daag Dehalvi, set mostly in Delhi and its environs during the 19th century. A beautiful and spirited woman, Wazir mingles with the noblemen of the Mughal court of Emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar, the English officers of the East India Company, the poets of the age and a whole panorama of other unforgettable characters.

“The Mirror of Beauty” is a translation of the original 2006 Urdu-language novel “Ka’i Chand The Sar-e-Aasmaan” by its author, Shamsur Rahman Faruqi. Mr. Faruqi, 78, who retired as a top bureaucrat in the Indian Postal Service, is a leading figure of Urdu literary criticism. He spoke to India Ink in Delhi about how he created the world of 19th century Delhi for “The Mirror of Beauty” and what he hopes young readers will get out of the book.

You live in Allahabad, a relatively smaller city, and your work has mostly been read by those within the Urdu-speaking or academic world. Suddenly you have a celebrity author like Orhan Pamuk calling your book “an erudite, amazing historical novel.” What’s it been like to step into the global literary spotlight?

I feel uncertain about all this. I am not sure that I really deserve all this attention, all this lionizing. I told my editor that I feel small, knowing that you guys are building me up so much, like a colossus. I am now long past those things. I have faced so much criticism in my life, from my own people, and also I have earned praise, love and appreciation. It makes no difference to me whether it is the global environment or the backwater of Allahabad. If Orhan Pamuk writes well about me, I’m happy; if he didn’t write well, I wouldn’t mind.

Keeper of The Sacred Wood

Mirror of Beauty

Mirror of Beauty

Shamsur Rahman Faruqi is said to be a formidable, forbidding figure. As a literary theorist and scholar of  , he looms so large that a fellow academic, a professor at Aligarh Muslim University, described him as the TS Eliot of  criticism. Eliot, famously, worked at a bank, while Faruqi, equally incongruously, was a career civil servant, employed by the Indian Postal Service. There is little evidence of that career in his conversation, peppered with allusion to French theorists, and imperious manner; he has a reputation for treating interviewers with asperity. In short, this is not a man who suffers fools. And journalists are nothing if not fools. Foolish questions, partially informed questions, are the operating currency of journalism. Unlike scholars, journalists have to be generalists, pick up information as widely and indiscriminately as possible and hope to perform, if only for the length of one piece, a convincing impression of familiarity with the subject at hand. Some readers might buy the performance (it is, after all, for their benefit); experts are likely to scoff.

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