Why the Book on Festivals makes it to Beijing ?


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Wang Wei

獨在異鄉為異客,

dú zài yì xiāng wéi yì kè

每逢佳節倍思親。

měi féng jiā jié bèi sī qīn

遙知兄弟登高處,

yáo zhī xiōng dì dēng gāo chù

遍插茱萸少一人

biàn chā zhū yú shǎo yì rén

 

Translation

Being Alone alien in a foreign land,

Every holiday is accompanied by reminiscences of one’s kith and kin.

Knowing from afar, the heights one’s elder and younger brothers have scaled;

Side Wearing Cornus officinalis, there is one soul less, amiss.

 

This poem has been written by Tang dynasty poet Wang Wei (701-761CE), who was known both for his poetry and paintings, in celebration of the ninth month festival, Chong Yang, which coincides with the Indian Navratri  and Durga Puja, the Korean Jungyangjeol, the Japanese Chōyō or Chrysanthemum festival.

Chinese lore hovers around travel and ancestor worship. Interestingly, the time many Indians appease their ancestral spirits is also before the advent of the Durga Puja  and Navratri, which is a period when Hindus venerate the feminine.

Recently, modern Chinese author, Yu Shicun, used the festival of chong yang as a topic for discussion in an academic event held in Beijing and the subject was his book, A Book on Festivals.

Read more about this event in this article from China Daily.

 

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