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Anuja Chauhan’s Baaz is a roaring and riveting love story set against the backdrop of the 1971: A Review

By Monica Arora

Baaz by Anuja Chauhan
Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: Harper Collins; 1 edition (1 May 2017)
Language: English

Anuja Chauhan has emerged as one of the most reliable contemporary writers of pop-fiction in recent years, with her effervescent love stories being set against the back drop of cricket in The Zoya Factor or the great Indian election in Battle for Bittora, the third estate in Those Pricey Thakur Girls or as a middle-class drama for property in The House that BJ Built.

The latest to emerge from the keys of her laptop is Baaz, a roaring and riveting love story set against the backdrop of the 1971 war when India helped the Mukti Vahini in East Pakistan (Bangladesh at present) in their war for independence. India joined the war on 3 December 1971, after Pakistan launched preemptive air strikes on North India. The formidable Indian Air Force took control of the eastern theatre of war and eventually the Allied Forces of Bangladesh and India left Pakistan with no choice but to surrender in Dacca on 16 December 1971. The pro-Pak bias of the then US President Richard Nixon and his Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was revealed when recently de-classified papers of the 1971 war describe how the American aircraft carrier USS Enterprise had orders to target Indian Army facilities. Baaz draws its climax by citing an episode of the Cold War and makes it a delightful mix of patriotism, romance, drama, cold-blooded action and much comic relief amidst the gritty setting. Continue reading

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Indian authors writing in English language

By Ankita Ghosh

While we were busy reading mostly American and European authors to satiate our hunger for novels written in the English language, a quiet and cautious breed of writers were steadily reinventing the idea of English language novels for us, here in the heartland of the subcontinent.

These writers came to be loosely known as ‘Indian authors writing in English language’. As the 21st century progressed and our desperate need to be readily anglicized was reversed by the chronic desire to be homebound, more and more people began reading them and soon they became a phenomenon.
These authors usually fall into two distinct categories. The first category of authors is headed by Chetan Bhagat, Ravinder Singh, Manju Kapur, Anuja Chauhan and the likes. They have equally been loved and loathed. The middle class that was reluctantly welcoming English into their households, loved them as they spoke of a transitioning India and wrote about its average citizens. Read more
Source: Meri News


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Karthika VK Set To Launch A New Division For Amazon-Owned Westland Publishers

By Somak Ghoshal

Karthika VK, who stepped down as Publisher and Chief Editor at HarperCollins Publishers India (HCI) last October, is set to start a new publishing division for Westland Publishers, now wholly owned by Amazon, according to sources. The name of the division is not known yet, but it is likely to start publishing titles from the third-quarter of this year.

Amazon.com Inc. acquired the publishing business of Westland, a Trent Limited subsidiary and one of India’s major publishing houses, last October as well, after initially having bought 26% stakes in it.

Westland, which includes imprints like Tranquebar and EastWest, published best-selling authors like Amish Tripathi, Ashwin Sanghi, Rashmi Bansal, Rujuta Diwekar, Preeti Shenoy, Devdutt Pattanaik, Anuja Chauhan, Ravi Subramanian and BKS Iyengar. Read more

Source: Huffington Post

 

 


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Amazon Signs Deal To Acquire The Publishing Business Of Westland

Online retailing giant Amazon.com Inc. has signed a deal to acquire the publishing business of Westland, a Trent Limited subsidiary and one of India’s major publishing houses, according to reports.

This acquisition, Vice President and Country Manager of Amazon India Amit Agarwal said, will “bring Westland’s highly talented authors and their books to even more customers in India and around the world”. Earlier this year Amazon had bought 26% stake in Westland for an estimated Rs 9.5 crores.

The publishing list of Westland, which includes imprints like Tranquebar and EastWest, feature best-selling authors like Amish Tripathi, Ashwin Sanghi, Rashmi Bansal, Rujuta Diwekar, Preeti Shenoy, Devdutt Pattanaik, Anuja Chauhan, Ravi Subramanian and BKS Iyengar. Read more


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India: Why Anuja Chauhan moved from HarperCollins after eight years and three bestsellers

Writer of commercial fiction Anuja Chauhan is said to have been offered a 6 figure dollar deal (Rs. 65 lakh in Indian rupees).

Anuja Chauhan

Anuja Chauhan (photo courtesy author’s twitter account)

Bestselling author Anuja Chauhan’s decision to move on from HarperCollins Publishers India, the publishing house she started her writing career with, to Westland, has surprised, if not shocked, the publishing world. All her three books ‒ The Zoya Factor (2008), Battle for Bittora: The Story of India’s Most Passionate Lok Sabha Contest (2010), and Those Pricey Thakur Girls (2013)  ‒ have been so far published by HarperCollins.

Chauhan will now publish her new book, The House that BJ Built, a sequel to Those Pricey Thakur Girls, with Westland, which has promised her more numbers, more publicity, more everything. Apparently, the negotiations have been going on for six long months. Chauhan’s earlier books will remain with to HarperCollins. Continue reading


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Literature echoes through the mountains

While the country’s elite disappeared to the Swiss Alps this summer, some set off to the mystical land of Bhutan. Our Westcoast resident tells us about her experience at the Mountain Echoes Literary Festival: DNA

The country that is fondly called ‘Last Shangri La’ played host to the Mountain Echoes Literary Festival, an initiative by the India Bhutan Foundation.  Spanning across three days, the literary fest brought together writers, environmentalists, scholars, photographers, poets, musicians and filmmakers to share stories, create memories, and engage in a cultural dialogue.  Continue reading


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India: Crossword Book Award nominees announced

manu josephJerry Pinto’s “Em and The Big Hoom”, Manu Joseph’s “The Illicit Happiness of Other People” and Rahul Pandita’s “Our Moon has Blood Clots” have been shortlisted for the Crossword Book Award 2013.

This was announced Wednesday by a panel comprising publishing consultant Jaya Bhattacharji Rose, authors Ravinder Singh, Anuja Chauhan and Vishwajyoti Ghosh and senior commissioning editor Vaishali Mathur. Continue reading