Tag Archives: ebooks

Kitaab’s The Best Asian Short Stories (TBASS) 2017 : Announcement

The Best Asian Short Stories- 2017 : A collection of stories by Asia’s best known contemporary writers is now available as an e-book. As an introductory offer, you can grab a copy of this book from Amazon at 40% discount!

Published by Kitaab, conceptualized by series editor Zafar Anjum and edited by Monideepa Sahu, the Best Asian Short Stories is an anthology which offers fresh insights into the experience of being Asian.

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Readers on rise, mostly in digital

By Mei Jia

Chinese adults read an average of just under eight books in 2016 – a tiny increase of 0.02 percent over 2015 – while a rapid increase of 6.1 percent was seen in the number of people reading digital content.

“We’ve seen fast growth in digital reading for eight consecutive years,” said Wei Yushan, head of the Chinese Academy of Press and Publication, who announced the academy’s major findings from the 14th survey of Chinese reading habits on Tuesday, ahead of World Book Day, which falls on Sunday.

Of the nearly eight books read by an average adult in 2016, about five were in print form and three were digital. Wei said similar surveys of readers from European countries and the United States show that they read 10 titles a year, while Japanese read 12. Read more

Source: The China Daily

Chinese bookstores adapt to social changes

By Xinhua

For Gao Hengrui, 20, going to a bookstore is no longer only about buying books, rather, it is a “culture hunt.”

Wine tasting, photo exhibitions, themed lectures — cultural events like these have made bookstores a “must-go” for young Chinese.

“Bookstores today are not just stores, but public spaces where people can relax,” Gao said.

As China’s consumer spending on culture grows, the country’s bookstores are reinventing themselves. Redefining themselves as “knowledge centers” or “cultural hubs,” physical bookstores are reviving an industry in a downturn.

CITIC Books, the book chain owned by Chinese conglomerate CITIC Group, for example, offers value-added services to meet the demand of a niche market.

CITIC Books targets a group of customers it calls “the rising class,” offering them new products in its bookstores, such as drones and 3D-enabled phones. Read more

Source: China Daily

Kindle books in Indian languages could be a game changer

By Jaya Bhattacharji Rose

Amazon India has announced that Kindle will launch digital books in five Indian languages—Hindi, Tamil, Marathi, Gujarati and Malayalam. The titles include Ishq Mein Shahar Hona by Ravish Kumar (Hindi), Rajaraja Chozhan by Sa. Na. Kannan (Tamil), Mrutyunjay by Shivaji Sawant (Marathi), Ek Bija Ne Gamta Rahiye by Kaajal Oza Vaidya (Gujarati), Aarachar by K.R. Meera (Malayalam) and Mayapuri by Shivani (Hindi). Kindle devices seventh generation and above will support Indic scripts, enabling readers to access such books.

This is a move that could be a game changer in India. Amazon India has moved methodically to embed itself in Indian publishing. First, it launched Kindle with free lifetime digital access provided by BSNL, but only for English e-books. In November, the acquisition of local publishing firm Westland—known for its commercial fiction best-sellers and translation programme—was completed at reportedly $6.5 million (around Rs44 crore), a small portion of the $5 billion allocated by Jeff Bezos as investment in India. In fact, Seattle-based Amazon Publishing’s translation imprint, AmazonCrossing, has surpassed all other publishers in the amount of world literature it makes available in the US. This was first highlighted in December 2015 by Chad Post, publisher, Open Letter Books, on his influential website, Three Percent. In October 2015 AmazonCrossing announced it had a $10 million budget to invest in translations worldwide. It is probably no coincidence that Amazon India vice- president and country manager Amit Agarwal has been inducted into the Bezos core team, which is responsible for its global strategy. Read more

Source: Live Mint

 

Amazon Kindle: Regional language ebooks are one of the best ways to rediscover Indian culture

By Nimish Sawant

I am a voracious reader. I hoard books, both on my Amazon Kindle as well as physical books, because I never want to be in a situation where I do not have anything to read at hand. I got bit by the reading bug back in the seventh grade. But much before it, the love for reading was inculcated in me as I watched my mother and grandmother read books in their free time. I would admire the book art on Marathi books that were lying around in the house, and would keep wondering when I will grow old enough to finish one of these myself.

While I have gone on to finish hundreds of books in the English language since, there are only a handful of Marathi and Hindi novels I have read. My knowledge of regional literature in Marathi and Hindi is limited to authors I studied at school or classic books that I read growing up. I know, I have never really made an effort to read much regional literature. But I would surely love to.  Read more

Source: First Post

 

The Myth of the Disappearing Book

After years of sales growth, major publishers reported a fall in their e-book sales for the first time this year, introducing new doubts about the potential of e-books in the publishing industry. A Penguin executive even admitted recently that the e-books hype may have driven unwise investment, with the company losing too much confidence in “the power of the word on the page.”

Yet despite the increasing realisation that digital and print can easily coexist in the market, the question of whether the e-book will “kill” the print book continues to surface. It doesn’t matter if the intention is to predict or dismiss this possibility; the potential disappearance of the book does not cease to stimulate our imagination.

Why is this idea so powerful? Why do we continue to question the encounter between e-books and print books in terms of a struggle, even if all evidence points to their peaceful coexistence?

The answers to these questions go beyond e-books and tell us much more about the mixture of excitement and fear we feel about innovation and change. Read more

The Stagnation Of eBooks Due To Closed Platforms And DRM: TechDirt

Craig Mod has a fascinating article for Aeon, talking about the unfortunate stagnation in digital books. He spent years reading books almost exclusively in ebook form, but has gradually moved back to physical books, and the article is a long and detailed exploration into the limits of ebooks today — nearly all of which are not due to actual limitations of the medium, but deliberate choices by the platform providers (mainly Amazon, obviously) to create closed, limited, DRM-laden platforms for ebooks.  Read more

Tencent set to dominate online literature market

Chinese internet giant Tencent is expected to dominate the market for online literature after completing its acquisition of Shanda Cloudary, Shanda’s online literature company, reports the China Business News.

Tencent and Shanda recently reached an agreement to jointly set up a new company, China Reading, in the online literature space. A number of literary websites affiliated with Tencent Literature and publishing institutions under Shanda Cloudary will come under the management of the new company following the acquisition. Read more

Kitaab podcast with Stephen Leather: Should new writers go for e-publishing?

Is e-publishing the right route for you? Should you go for traditional publishers or should you e-publish on your own? What are the required steps to successfully e-publish a book? British thriller writer, Stephen Leather, explains all this and more in this Kitaab podcast.

Stephen Leather is one of the UK’s most successful thriller writers. His bestsellers have been translated into more than ten languages. He has also written for television shows such as London’s Burning, The Knock and the BBC’s Murder in Mind series.

This talk was recorded at the Publishing Symposium@Singapore Writers Festival 2013.

China: The ebook era could change the plight of short story writers

Short story authors used to need a collection of stories before securing a book deal. Writer Zhang Wei and book critic Yan Jingming both expressed publicly through a literature forum last year that short story writers struggle with a limited readership and a small slice of the publishing pie. Short story anthologies rarely make bestseller lists.

But the ebook era could change all of that.

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