OmkaraEven though Vishal Bhardwaj has made a trilogy based on Shakespeare’s work already, the director doesn’t mind making a few more films based on the bard’s work.

During a short chat up at the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival, the filmmaker revealed that while he hasn’t planned his next film yet, he would like to take up more of Shakespeare’s work for films. “Perhaps a comedy next based on one his plays,” quips Bhardwaj.

GulzarIndian literature is very rich and directors should be careful when they adapt them into a film or a TV series. It should not have unnecessary tinge of entertainment, feels poet-lyricist Gulzar.

The 79-year-old director, who is this year’s Dadasaheb Phalke awardee, adapted the works of well-known Indian writers for the big and small screen.

Gulzar said literature can not be reformer, it can only remind or record the past era.

Crowdtivate is co-managed by StarHub i3 and its partner, Crowdonomic, and is supported by National Book Development Council of Singapore, among others

Singapore telco StarHub has announced the beta launch of a new crowdfunding platform for the region: Crowdtivate (www.crowdtivate.com).

According to a statement from the telco, this online social launchpad is ‘aimed at helping local and Asia-based entrepreneurs and artists make their innovative ideas come true’.

Crowdtivate is an open platform for entrepreneurs and artists that will facilitate financial contributions from supporters around the region via a funding system in return for specific rewards.

tagoreMaverick film directors inject LGBT erotica in India’s cultural icon Rabindranath Tagore’s works, according to a report

Rabindranath Tagore, Asia’s first Nobel laureate in literature, has been interpreted as a gay rights champion by two maverick Indian film directors in their recent works.

Tagore, who won the Nobel in 1913 for Gitanjali, a collection of songs and poems, has had several films made on his novels and short stories. They have ranged from advocating women’s emancipation to support for society’s marginalized. Now an Indian director known for making films that revel in shock elements – full-frontal sex and profanities – has had his latest film, with strong undertones of gay, lesbian and transgender sex, released in India amidst mixed reviews.