Tag Archives: Indian poets

Book Excerpt: The Speaking Stone by Pravat Kumar Padhy

A glimpse of the poems written by Pravat Kumar Padhy in his poetry collection, The Speaking Stone (Published by Authorspress, 2020)

The Speaking Stone is a tree of beauty, where the poet muses about nature that is the open text of truth and mysteries. I believe that Divinity is the embodiment of truth and that truth is love and peace. This truth breathes in the grass, sand, sky, mountains, sea, clouds and others objects of this collection. Poet unmasks this truth to present the soul of these poems.

– Stephen Gill, Poet and Novelist, Canada
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Someday we may have a common anthem for our planet!- Interview with poet Abhay K

Poetry is the language of the universe.

In a world where chaos reigns in so many forms, poetry is a solace for many. At times, compared to magic, poetry heals and comforts in strange ways. Poets conjure magic with their words and captivate the readers with their ability to capture the finer nuances of life in their poems. One of the many poets whose work continues to inspire a lot of readers is Abhay K.

Abhay K. (b.1980) is the author of a memoir and eight poetry collections including The Seduction of Delhi,The Eight-Eyed Lord of Kathmandu, The Prophecy of Brasilia and The Alphabets of Latin America. He is the editor of CAPITALS, New Brazilian Poems, The Bloomsbury Anthology of Great Indian Poems and The Bloomsbury Book of Great Indian Love Poems. His poems have been published in over 60 literary journals across the world including Poetry Salzburg Review.

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Five female Indian poets you’ll fall in love with

By Awanthi Vardaraj

These female Indian poets were all trailblazers; they were among the first, and it is on their shoulders that I stood when I first began writing poetry as a child.

I used to read poetry from the subcontinent as a child and marvel at the imagery it conjured up for me. As a little girl who often felt at odds with her culture and her identity, it was words that often grounded me, and those words came in the form of books and poetry. I wish I could tell you that in the field of literature women were afforded equal opportunities, but this was not the case. The women who wrote anyway did so with the full knowledge that they were the exception, not the norm. They left an indelible mark on literature in general, and Indian literature in particular.

Something that saddens me, therefore, is how rarely people seem to reminisce about female Indian poets. When I ask people what their favourite poems or verses are, nobody mentions Sarojini Naidu, Kamala Surayya, Amrita Pritam or Toru Dutt. They were all trailblazers; they were among the first, and it is on their shoulders that I stood when I first began writing poetry as a child. It is on their shoulders I stand today as a poet, a writer and an essayist. I am not ignorant of their contributions, and nor should you be. Read more

Source: Wearyourvoicemag

The poet who wasn’t Shelley

For 14 years, from 1952-66, Ashokamitran worked at Gemini Studios, the film production house in Madras founded by S.S. Vasan— the Boss—that was then an entertainment powerhouse. The young Ashokamitran’s job, he writes, in “this movie kingdom of six hundred subjects” was to “mutilate large numbers of newspapers and affix the clippings under a variety of heads from ‘Aarey Milk Colony’ to ‘Zoroastrianism’. These were stored in cupboards and cupboards of files.” At Gemini, it was not just film stars that Ashokamitran encountered. In a droll memoir of his time there, ‘My Years With Boss’ , he writes of keeping company with poets. Besides the home-bred variety, Gemini Studios and its increasingly befuddled staff also played host to poets and lapsed Communists from outside India. An excerpt from Ashokamitran’s account of the visit of a poet from England, who was neither Tennyson nor Wordsworth nor Shelley, the few English poets the employees at Gemini could feign familiarity with.

Gemini Studios was the favourite haunt of poets like S.D.S. Yogiar, Sangu Subramanyam, Krishna Sastry and Harindranath Chattopadhyaya. It had an excellent mess which supplied good coffee at all times of the day and for most part of the night. Read more

Source: Live Mint

India: N E poets misunderstood for their poetry of conflict: Ngangom

New Delhi, Feb 24 (PTI) Eminent Manipuri poet Robin S Ngangom believes it is wrong to typecast the poets from North East as unduly obsessed with the poetry of “politics” and “brutality”.

Ngangom, who writes in English and Meitei, says some poets have moved beyond merely recording the events of insurgency.

“There is often this charge made that the poets of North East are unduly obsessed with the poetry of politics and brutality.

“But few fine poets have moved beyond merely recording events and have internalised the complex conflict between themselves and the social environment,” Ngangom said during the inaugural session of North-East and Northern Writers’ Meet.

He said the poets in Manipur often have to take the risk of writing as a witness to the political violence in the region. Read more

Source:India.com

Zee Jaipur Literature Festival: Mumbai poet gets Khushwant Singh prize

For her collection titled ‘When God is a Traveller’, Mumbai-based poet Arundhati Subramaniam was on Saturday awarded the inaugural Khushwant Singh memorial prize for poetry at the Zee Jaipur Literature Festival 2015. The prize is worth Rs. 2 lakh. It was open to Indian poets who brought out books in English (including translations), between September 15, 2013 and September 15, 2014.

For her collection titled ‘When God is a Traveller’, Mumbai-based poet Arundhati Subramaniam was on Saturday awarded the inaugural Khushwant Singh memorial prize for poetry at the Zee Jaipur Literature Festival 2015. The prize is worth Rs. 2 lakh. It was open to Indian poets who brought out books in English (including translations), between September 15, 2013 and September 15, 2014.

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