The grading will determine whether they can participate in an event: Huff Post

The Ministry of Culture has come up with an absurd policy.

According to an Indian Express report, the culture ministry has decided to rate artistes and writers across the country. The ratings will determine which events they will be sent to.

The grading has already begun.

Under a pilot project, the ministry has already graded 185 artists into three categories — O (outstanding), P (promising), W (waiting), the report said.

The ministry has issued a notice saying only “applicants placed in the Outstanding and Promising Categories will be selected for participation” in festivals.

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Lack of profound experiences and harsh realities like war and mass exodus are forcing regional writers in India to hold on to themes like personal agonies and dilemmas in their works, eminent Malayalam novelist Sethu observed. The choice of such themes deny them a place in world literature as Indian writers are often forced to harp on personal sorrows, Sethu said here last evening on the sidelines of the release of the English translation of his short story collection A Guest for Arundhati and other stories.

GulzarIndian literature is very rich and directors should be careful when they adapt them into a film or a TV series. It should not have unnecessary tinge of entertainment, feels poet-lyricist Gulzar.

The 79-year-old director, who is this year’s Dadasaheb Phalke awardee, adapted the works of well-known Indian writers for the big and small screen.

Gulzar said literature can not be reformer, it can only remind or record the past era.

Libby Whitehouse looks at whether India’s effervescent literary culture is attracting established and new writers from either side of the Atlantic: Publishing Perspectives

Historically, Indian writers have tended to go to the West to get their books published but with e-books posing an ever-increasing challenge to publications there, industry experts indicate a reverse flow may have just begun.

Indeed, there are murmurs that the big and burgeoning Indian book publishing market and the country’s effervescent literary culture have begun to attract both established and new writers from the either side of the Atlantic seeking a bigger audience and accolade.

Peacocks among the Tamarind Trees