Mufti Abdul Qayyum, an accused in the 2002 Akshardham temple attack case who was acquitted by the Supreme Court last year, won’t be able to tell his story.

Mr Qayyum had planned to release a book on the 11 years he spent behind the bars for a crime he never committed, at a seminar in Ahmedabad on Thursday. But a diktat from the police has put brakes on it.

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Artists have received a castrating message to the effect that anyone who identifies as a subject or a muse of a work is liable to block its publication: Haaretz

In a ruling handed down last month, the Supreme Court rejected a writer’s appeal of a district court decision, which included a ban against the publication and distribution of his novel. In effect, the court ordered that the book be shelved, after it had already been published, printed and even sold in hundreds of copies.

modi-and-godhraWhen Narendra Modi visited the office of the SIT (Special Investigation Team) in Gandhinagar on March 27, 2010, it was exactly 11 months after the Supreme Court had directed it to “look into” a criminal complaint. Modi’s visit in response to an SIT summons was a milestone in accountability—at least in potential. It was the first time any chief minister was being questioned by an investigating agency for his alleged complicity in communal violence. The summons were on the complaint by Zakia Jafri, the widow of former Congress MP Ehsan Jafri, who had been killed in the first of the post-Godhra massacres in 2002.

Vikram-SethDisappointed at the Supreme Court’s ruling upholding Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), author Vikram Seth said political parties that favour this ruling should know that homophobia came into India and not homosexuality.

“There is no question about the fact that this ruling has pushed us backwards, and now you will be a criminal if you are open about it. Can you imagine the huge weight of this law of Indian Supreme Court, a revered institution?” Seth told IANS.