Leave a comment

Book Review: Horizon Afar by Jayanthi Sankar

By Lakshmi Menon

horizon-afar-wth-bleed-1

Title: Horizon Afar

Author: Jayanthi Sankar

Trabslated by: P Muralidharan

Publisher: Kitaab International

Pages: 231

Price: Rs 299

To buy

Horizon Afar is a collection of short stories by Jayanthi Sankar, translated from their original Tamil by P Muralidharan and published by Kitaab International. While it falls neatly into the rapidly growing, ever-fertile genre of diasporic literature, this collection is interesting in the myriad glimpses that it accords us of the Tamil diaspora in Singapore.

The experiences of Tamil immigrants in a multicultural country like Singapore are outlined by the author, herself a member of that very community – this is belied by the intimacy with which she writes about them. “Won’t she crawl anymore?” a despairing father asks of his wife, on learning that his child whose early years he has missed on account of working abroad, has now learned to walk on her own. The average reader can easily feel the wistful, quiet sadness in his question, and a reader who is familiar with the immigrant experience knows the truth behind the emotion, of a parent who has missed their child growing up.

Continue reading

Advertisements


Leave a comment

The magic of allegory

By Shafey Kidwai

Isa Kamari’s “Tweet” is a modern-day fable that juxtaposes human condition with natural environment

tweet-jkt

Does the much-needed sense of contentment elude zillions of children who seek uninterrupted amusement through mobile and internet? Does prattling of birds soothe their inflamed nerves or does it symbolise ungainliness of their tweeter ? Do they now look for super birds when they find themselves surrounded by birds? Is it the time to ponder over ‘tweet’ instead of concentrating ‘twitter’ for conveying one’s feelings instantly? Should we look beyond twitter that has become the muse of many artists of our time? These unsettling questions, coupled with a deep sense of bewilderment and dislocation that breathless ubiquitous techno-culture produced, are creatively explored by an eminent Singaporean writer Isa Kamari in his recently published novel “Tweet”.

It is his first novel in English though he has published nine novels, two collection of poems, a collection of short stories and a number of theatre scripts in Malay. Read more

Source: The Hindu


Leave a comment

The little boy who decided to write (and publish!) his own book

Many a child has amused parents with fantastical (sometimes non-sensical!) stories dreamed up in a way only a toddler could manage, and surely many have also “written” books with a few drawings or scribbles on paper. Rishav Gupta (now age 8), took things a bit further.

“I want my own storybook!” Rishav told his mother Srinanda, an early years teacher at Chatsworth International School, when he was just 3.

At this stage he wasn’t writing, though he’d demonstrated a love of storybooks and a keenness for drawing.

“It all started with doodling,” Srinanda recalls. “Pay attention to the doodles: every scratch can have a story behind it if you just ask. Every curvy line can have a story.” If I wasn’t a teacher I might not have known that, but as a teacher you have an awareness that it’s something truly authentic worth paying attention to. Read more

Source: Sassy Mama


Leave a comment

Book Review: The Girl who Ran Away in a Washing Machine by Anu Kumar

By Rajat Chaudhuri

washing-machine

Short stories? Who writes short stories these days? Aren’t we reminded time and again that publishers are no more interested in this form? But then, isn’t the novel too going to give up its ghost in a couple of hours as grey haired Cassandras predict with the regularity of automatons? Aren’t we advised that narrative nonfiction and its close cousin the diary or even the memoir, is the go-to form for the author who doesn’t want to be put on an artificial respirator? And just when this cumulonimbus of bad news bears down upon you, the fiction author (or the reviewer) you chance upon a book which simply says the “genre” is in safe hands and that this oldest of storytelling arts still has a lot to offer.

The Girl Who Ran Away in a Washing Machine and Other Stories is a collection of stories by Anu Kumar, published by Kitaab. The stories in this slim volume travel the distance from tony upper class neighbourhoods of Singapore to back of beyond villages of India, from futuristic urban settings with robot newsreaders to the ruins of the Indus Valley civilisation, taking the reader on a journey of discoveries that she will cherish for long. But what is definitely the strength of this book is the range of subjects and themes in which Kumar engages, without overburdening her audience.

Here you will find a wonderful story of love lost and found, a magical adventure with a ghost among the ruins of an ancient civilisation, a couple of tales where you chance upon men with weird eyebrows, a sprinkling of magic everywhere, a dash of the absurd sometimes and a wink and a nod towards science fiction. Elsewhere social evils like dowry, corruption, religious intolerance or the crisis of farmer suicides are spun into the narrative with an expert hand, imbuing those tales with a sense of urgency, without being stilted or preachy.

In the eponymous story set in rural Punjab, we meet Neha, newly married to Manjit, finding solace and a hiding place from her in-laws inside the symbolic space of a washing machine that was part of her dowry. “Washing Machine” and indeed a few other stories have an alluring quality that gives the reader the sense of drifting on a calm current as she gets engrossed by the storytelling. Delectable prose coupled with a narrative that slowly circles inwards, curling towards the beating heart of the plot, perhaps imparts this quality to Kumar’s stories. But this is not to say that there are no surprises here, no spindrift or maelstrom, no intrusions of the fantastic or the absurd. In fact, surprises are aplenty and some of these stories wear the edginess on their sleeves.

Continue reading


1 Comment

New Release: Dreamagination by Rishav Gupta

dream-bk-cover

When Srinanda Gupta was reading stories to her 6-month-old son, little did she know then that this boy would be an author at the age of eight.

Srinanda fondly recalls the day Rishav walked up to her with his drawings and said he wanted a “real” book.

“I clearly remember how happy and confused I was at the same time because I did not quite understand what he meant. After a conversation, Rishav made it clear that he actually wanted to be an author,” says the mother who also teaches at Chatsworth International School in Singapore.  She decided to nurture his passion and give him time to become responsible for his own initiative. Rishav named the book The Lion’s Walk. Each page focused on a place and some detail that he observed of that particular place.

“He narrated the story while I documented it. What was unique was how Rishav read books, made connections with his personal experiences and applied his knowledge in his writing. I got the pages printed and stitched together,” shares Srinanda. That was Rishav’s first book!

Now this Grade 2 student of Chatsworth International School, Singapore, has a book to his credit Dreamagination, published by Kitaab International.

dremagination

The book is a collection of 10 stories written by Rishav between the age of 3 and 7. Dreamagination is more than a book. It is a writing journey of a young boy from doodling, to drawing and then consolidating his ideas in writing.

“This is a big wish come true! You must dream and when the dream becomes bigger, bigger and bigger, it comes true. I want to encourage everyone around the world to write because it helps people to communicate and you can express your heart full of stories. You need dreamagination to live,” says Rishav.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

New Release: Rooh se Rooh tak by Candy de Launey

front-page_v3Published in 2016 by Simurg, an imprint of Kitaab International Pte. Ltd Rooh se Rooh tak, a collection of poems by Candy de Launey explores dimensions of love and fury,
sadness and joy and quiet truths about the variety of human emotions … where soul and body and emotion and consciousness are never separate but a part of the great mystery of life, a riddle whose answer perhaps is love … or perhaps not … with all its fears, longings, expressions and suppressions … dying to take the
risk of discovering her own core self …

The 25 Poems are all in English, and only one is in Hindi of which 6 are musical
recitations which have been composed beautifully by Anand Dhamelia and
Vijutash Angurana and available on Sound cloud.

About the author:

Candy de Launey began writing at the age of 6. Candy holds a Master’s in Business Administration and has studied Psychotherapy & Counselling. She is currently studying Masters in Counselling and hopes to complete her Doctorate research in the areas of: The natural path to Happiness and application of neuroscience in Marketing. Candy is a Leadership & Executive Coach, and a Marketing & Strategic business Consultant by profession with over 23 years of an illustrious career globally. She hails from Bangalore and currently resides in Singapore.

In Rooh se Rooh tak…she bears her Soul to give us a glimpse into the musings of
the dawn, dusk and nights of Love, longing, silence, beauty…fragrant with the
notes of Indian classical tones and western hues which catch the breath and
wake up the senses.

 


Leave a comment

New Release: Horizon Afar by Jayanthi Sankar

horizon-afar-wth-bleed-1

Published by Kitaab International, Horizon Afar is a collection of Tamil short stories written by Jayanthi Sankar and translator into English by P. Muralidharan.

This collection of short stories traverse beyond the contemporary life of Singapore on a quest to answer the eternal question, “What made life on this earth mechanical and devoid of meaning?” Presented here is a peek into the other side of modern life, opening new windows to the life and culture of various ethnicities of South East Asia.

Jayanthi Sankar is popular in the mainland just as amongst the writers of the diaspora. Her presence is totally absent in the stories themselves. The human side of Singapore, its students, the life of migrant workers and their aspirations to acquire resident status, interracial origins, lives of sex workers, cohabiting youth and many more such lucid narrations motivated me to translate them for English readers. The short story, “A Few Pages from Yuka Wong’s Diary”, on century-old cultural and political issues of China and Japan, is a unique work by any author of Indian origin.

About the author:

Jayanthi Sankar has been creatively active for the past twenty-one years in short stories, novels, translation, transcreations and essays. Several of her books have been awarded by renowned organisations. Born and brought up in India, she has lived in Singapore since 1990. After Loss and Laws, Horizon Afar is the second collection of her Tamil short stories that have been translated into English.

Her website at www.jeyanthisankar.com gives a glimpse of her writing journey.

About the translator:

P. Muralidharan writes with the pseudonym Sathyanandhan. He lives in Chennai, India, and continues his creative quest as a poet, a critic and a novelist in the Tamil literary arts. His ability to write creatively in all genres like short story, poems, columns, novel and criticism on a variety of subjects has made him stand out in the Modern Tamil literature for more than a decade. His works have been published in literary magazines like Kanaiyazhi. Thinnai.com has been a consistent platform for his works. Besides a collection of poetry Veliye veedu, his novels Purshartham and Vigraham have been published in print. Two of his novels Bodhi Maram and Mulveli were published as a series during 2012 and 2013 in Thinnai. His works on Ramayana and Zen, published in Thinnai during 2011 have gained him a wider readership recently. He writes weekly columns in pathivukal.com. All of his works are republished in his blog at https://sathyanandhan.com.

To buy: Horizon Afar