Do you have a poem ready?

Here is a contest where you can win £1000 for a single poem and find a place in an anthology of award winning writers.

First Prize: £1,000

2nd Prize: £500

3rd Prize: £250

The contest ends on July 31st.

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‘Small is beautiful’ was a term popularised by EF Schumacher in his  book of the same  name.

But how small is beautiful?

Now we have a writing contest offering an award for a story that has a maximum of 500 words.

Do you have one for the picking? 

The last date for entry is 31 st July, 2019.

China’s Beijingcream has extended their flash fiction deadline until this Sunday. 

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Their announcement:

“Submit stories 500-700 words to fiction@beijingcream.com before 11:59 pm this Sunday for a chance to read your piece over beers at Great Leap Brewing’s Original No. 6 courtyard on Sunday, July 13. If you need any inspiration, check out the piece that just went up on the Anthill about the heartache of being alone in a city of 21 million.

She was an art student from Beijing, and said she drank so she could get a good night’s sleep. I wondered what personal tragedy, heartache or sadness was at the bottom of her glass.

Farah-GhuznaviIn 2010, I was amazed and delighted when my flash fiction piece ‘Judgement Day’ won Highly Commended in the Commonwealth Short Story Competition. At the time, entries to the competition consisted of no more than 600 words; and while those words could in theory be written on any topic, the organisers did provide a theme each year to assist the undecided writer.

In 2010, the theme was ‘Science, Technology and Society’. When I heard about it, my heart sank. I knew very little about writing flash fiction, and even less about science and technology! By default, my focus would have to be on the ‘society’ part of that equation. Anyway, I’m not quite sure where the original idea came from, but I ended up writing a piece exploring how the institution of marriage might change in the future as a result of advances in science and technology, and what might remain disturbingly familiar to us today – a kind of futuristic fable.