IMG_0686Harry Potter came into being more than two decades ago, in 1997, with The Philosopher’s Stone. The movie series started a little later in 2001, after JK Rowling had already published the fourth adventure of Harry Potter, The Goblet of Fire. The last in the series of Harry Potter books ended with The Deathly Hallows in 2007. 

IMG_0685The popularity of young Harry Potter is such that Warner Brothers continue to create scripts of other adventures from the world of Harry Potter, namely Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them and the latest, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindewald.  There are also reports every now and then of more such outcroppings with the next one predicted in 2020. Non-fiction books about the world of Harry Potter have come to light this year and some more are to follow.

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By Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé

ELAINE CHIEW HEAD SHOTS 9806asb_w

Elaine Chiew is a writer and a visual arts researcher, editor of Cooked Up: Food Fiction From Around the World (New Internationalist, 2015) and her short story collection The Heartsick Diaspora is forthcoming from Penguin Random House SEA (Oct 2019) and Myriad Editions UK (Jan 2020). Twice winner of the Bridport Short Story Competition, she has published numerous stories in anthologies in the UK, US and Singapore. Originally from Malaysia, Chiew graduated from Stanford Law School and worked as a corporate securities lawyer in New York and Hong Kong before studying for an MA in Asian Art History at Lasalle College of the Arts Singapore, a degree conferred by Goldsmiths, University of London. Elaine lives in Singapore and blogs about art at www.invisibleflaneuse.blogspot.com. In this interview, she reveals more about her new book and her ideas.

Why do you write?

Very simply, I can’t not write, call it word-constipation or what Danish short story writer Naja Marie Aidt calls ‘an urge that cannot be overlooked’ or a ‘point of desire’. A character or voice arrives out of the blue, takes hold of you as in a waking dream, make me real, it says, and you do.

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Here is a UK- based flash fiction contest where you can choose your entry fee.

They say: “We operate a choose your own entry fee system. The suggested entry fee is £7 per entry (£6 per entry for two, or £5 per entry for three or more), but if that’s prohibitive, just pay what you can afford. If you’d like to support a writer who can’t afford the full fee, why not add a pound or two?”

The contest ends 30 th November, 2019.

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Rati Agnihotri is a bilingual English-Hindi writer, poet and television journalist. She did her BA (Hons) in English Literature from Miranda House, University of Delhi, and MA International Journalism from University of Leeds, UK. She runs the poetry group ‘Moonweavers: Chaand ke Julaahe’ in the city along with other fellow poets. Her book of poem, The Sunset Sonata, was published by the Sahitya Akademi. Her English poems have appeared in Indian Literature, South Asian Ensemble, Nether Magazine, Dead Flowers: A Poetry Rag, The Challenge, Muse India, Kritya and others. Her Hindi poems have been published in Pakhee, Retpath, Samvadiya, Yuddhrat Aam Aadmi, Parikatha,among others. She also translates poetry and nonfiction from Hindi to English. Agnihotri’s previous assignments include a fellowship at Radio Deutsche Welle’s south Asian department in Bonn, Germany. She currently works as a correspondent for China’s CNC World TV and based at their office in New Delhi.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Syima Aslam and Irna Qureshi, organising the Bradford Literature Festival after it received funding from the Arts Council.

Syima Aslam and Irna Qureshi, organising the Bradford Literature Festival after it received funding from the Arts Council: Telegraph & Argus

A new literature festival for Bradford aims to be the first in the UK to champion world literature and British writing on an equal footing.

The Bradford Literature Festival is being set up by two local bookworms who believed the city deserved its own festival to rival those in Hay-on-Wye and Edinburgh.

Aoife Mannix, a recognisable voice on the UK live literature scene, has arrived in Viet Nam for the European Literature Days 2014 that begins May 22.

Mannix held a workshop on creative writing yesterday with Vietnamese writers and readers at the British Council in HCM City, and will speak today at another workshop at the English department of the HCM City Foreign Languages and Information Technology University on how to use literature in English teaching.

Today’s English literature reflects ethnic diversity and it’s not just the current fashion: Kate Williams in Al Jazeera

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412In early April, the Baileys Prize shortlist for fiction by women was announced. Although it is a UK-based prize, there are no authors who are sole citizens of the UK on the shortlist: Donna Tartt is American, Hannah Kent is Australian, Audrey Magee and Eimear McBride are Irish, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is from Nigeria and Jhumpa Lahiri holds both US and British citizenships.