Category Archives: Singapore

4th Singapore Literature Festival – The Politics of Hope

2020 Singapore Literature Festival features (clockwise from top left) Jackie Wang, Meira Chand, Tania De Rozario, Elaine Castillo, Nuraliah Norasid, and PJ Thum, among others.

NYC-based literary non-profit Singapore Unbound announces the 4th Singapore Literature Festival which is happening online from October 1st to 3rd, 2020. The festival is open to all. The theme for this year is ‘Politics of Hope‘. Going online for the first time, this independent, biennial festival brings together Singaporean and American authors and audiences for lively conversations about literature and society. The Singapore Literature Festival is conceived and organized by a group of Singaporean volunteers—writers, artists, and creatives—who call New York City and Singapore home.

You can know more about them and also follow the festival updates by following Singapore Unbound: Website | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

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Call for entries: Singapore at Home: Life across Lines

Singapore At Home

The thought of home is imbued with bliss and pain, comfort and guilt. In all its manifestations— whether it makes us or breaks us—home nurtures a tender, heartbreaking beauty. A lived space, it shapes our life experience. But more importantly, the people we share our home with transform the meaning we seek in a place that is hopefully our refuge.  Read more

Singapore Literature Prize: Shortlist announced

Singapore Literature Prize is considered to be Singapore’s top literary award. For the first time in the history of these awards, they will be held online on August 28th, 2020 at 8 p.m.

The shortlist includes 52 works in 12 categories across three genres, fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction. Furthermore, it also includes works in four languages Chinese, Malay, English and Tamil. The top award in these categories includes a cash prize of S$3,000 and a special plaque. Interestingly, more than half of the writers have been shortlisted for the first time, while five will contest in two different categories.

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Kitaab TV: The Slow-Mo Approach: How Singapore is handling the Covid-19 Crisis

In this episode of Straight Talk with P. N. Balji, the veteran Singaporean journalist and commentator analyses how successfully the Singapore government is handling the Covid-19 (coronavirus) crisis that has engulfed the whole world.

Balji, who entered journalism in 1970, has worked at five newspapers – TODAY (as founding editor), The Straits Times, TNP (as founding editor) and the now-defunct Malaysia Mail and New Nation. During his long career, Balji also helmed New Nation, TNP and TODAY. He has penned down his thoughts and experiences as an editor in his book, The Reluctant Editor.

Kitaab TV: Veteran Singaporean journalist on the failures and successes of global leadership in dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic

Today is a sad day in Singapore: two deaths have been reported here due to the Covid-19 outbreak. In this inaugural episode of Straight Talk with P. N. Balji, the veteran Singaporean journalist and commentator analyses the global response to the Covid-19 crisis (coronavirus) and how Singapore, Taiwan and Hong Kong have emerged as examples for other nations to follow to battle the pandemic.

How the world of Singlit glowed despite Covid- 19

The world of Singlit glowed from March 7th 2020 to March 15 th 2020 with different events to promote Singaporean literature. Adequate precautions were taken to keep the participants and visitors safe. Kitaab participated in the event aswell.

Of the sixty events planned, thirty five had to be cancelled for the COVID-19 situation. They had workshops, and book sales and most interesting of all what Singlit  is famous for — noir fiction. Here is a description of how the spoken word poet Deborah Emmanuel conducted the event. Read more

In Memory of Victoria : How a Mother adjusts to Loss of Motherhood

Book review by Koi Kye Lee

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Title: Loss Adjustment

 Author: Linda Collins

Publisher: Ethos Books (2019)

 

Loss Adjustment is a non-fiction work by Linda Collins, a New Zealander who has lived in tropical Singapore for almost three decades. Collins, a wife, mother, and copyeditor with the republic’s English daily, The Straits Times, suffered a devastating loss when her only child, Victoria Skye Pringle McLeod, decided to take her own life on April 14, 2014. She was only seventeen.

The memoir takes an unflinching look at the devastation wrought on Collins and her husband, Malcolm McLeod, as they tried to come to terms with their daughter’s death. Loss Adjustment starts with a glimpse into Collins’s normal morning routine in their home, where she, like other mothers, rises early to prepare for her daughter’s first day of a new school term. However, the routine was disrupted when Victoria (lovingly called Vic) was nowhere to be found in their condo. Before discovering that her daughter was missing, Collins had a strange dream where Victoria said: “I’m free, I’m free”.

Panicked, Collins woke up Malcolm and they started searching for her. An ominous feeling loomed over Collins as she ran towards the hill that led to other condominium blocks. As they wondered where their only child was, the building security guard, Mohan, arrived on his motorbike. But something was amiss — the burly and kindly man was sobbing. He conveyed a piece of bad news — Victoria was dead. She had taken her own life by stepping off the ledge on the 10th floor of a condominium block. Read more

The Best Reads of 2019: Books Writers Loved this Year

Compiled by Mitali Chakravarty

 

And there’s a hand, my trusty fere!
And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

Auld Lang Syne, Robert Burns,1788

 

It is that time of the year again when we bid adieu to the old and party to welcome the new. And this year it is not just an old year but the old decade that ends – this new year we start the third decade of the second millennia. With much goodwill, as the poet Burns says, we asked some writers who have featured on our pages to contribute two of their favourite reads from this year and they obliged… A huge thanks to all these fantastic writers who share what their favourite books have been this year.

51otYV5ZqEL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_We start with Suzanne Kamata, an award winning writer from Japan, who has been a part of our magazine and the first Best Asian Short Stories in 2017. This is what Suzanne wrote: “One book which particularly impressed me was Under the Broken Sky, a novel-in-verse by Mariko Nagai, about a Japanese girl stranded in Soviet-occupied Manchuria. Although we often hear and read about the atrocities committed by the Japanese Army in Asia, we rarely hear the voices of the innocent bystanders, like children. Nagai manages to distill complicated and difficult events into crystalline free verse. Although this book was written with middle grade readers in mind, I would recommend it to adults as well.  Read more

How Isa Kamari’s Kiswah journeys from ‘the abyss of darkness to enlightenment’

Book review by Mitali Chakravarty

Front cover

Title: Kiswah

Author: Isa Kamari

Publisher: Kitaab, 2019

Isa Kamari is a well-known legend in the Singapore literary community. He has won numerous awards — the Anugerah Sastera Mastera, the SEA Write award and Singapore Cultural Medallion, the Anugerah Tun Seri Lanang. He has been written about and discussed in Universities. With ten novels, nine of which have been translated into English — and some into more languages like Arabic, Mandarin, Urdu and Turkish — three poetry books and plays under his belt and one novella written in English by him, one can well see him as a maestro of storytelling.

The last translation of his novel Kiswah has been launched in November at the Writer’s Festival in Singapore. Isa, a reformer at heart who claims to write only when he is very moved, authored and published three novels together in 2002. Intercession was to do with much needed comments on Islam — an outcome of the 9/11 bombing in New York; The Tower was to do with an individual’s own journey through materialism to a more spiritual plane and the last, which is what will be dealt with here, was Kiswah, a critique on the effects of pornography on young minds.

Most of Isa’s books can be seen as the journey of the protagonist towards self realisation. The issues he takes up are of global concern, though he claims to focus on the Malay community in his books. Read more

Ovidia Yu, Chia Joo Ming & Peter Augustine Goh win South East Asian Writers Award

The S.E.A. Write Award (South East Asian Writers Award) has been revived after a three-year break with three writers from Singapore selected for the honour. The three winners have been selected for the three years, 2016-2018, when this prestigious ASEAN award was put on hold to mourn the passing of the late King Bhumibol.

Ovidia Yu gets the award for 2016; ChiaJoo Ming for 2017 and Peter Augustine Goh for 2018.

Yu, a writer of light detective novels set in 1930s Singapore, said, her first reaction was “amazement and disbelief… mostly because I write humorous murder mysteries and, on the literary hierarchy, that ranks far below poetry and literary novels”.

“It feels like a validation of something I deeply believe – that whatever we set out to write has first to entertain,” she added.”Reading is only a luxury we can’t afford if it’s not fun. After all, we somehow afford bubble tea and mobile phones.” Read more

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