Tag Archives: Booker Prize

“It’s easy to be seduced by a story, to be persuaded that what you are hearing is true.”- Avni Doshi

Rituparna Mahapatra in conversation with Avni Doshi talking about her journey, the writing process and the future plans.

Photo credit: Sharon Haridas

The first sentence came to me as a revelation, within it was the shape of the whole story. I wanted to begin with something powerful!

Avni Doshi, writer of Indian Origin, longlisted for Booker 2020.

Not many can claim their debut novels to make it to the list of the World’s most prestigious literary awards. Dubai based Indian novelist Avni Doshi has done that; her debut novel ‘Burnt Sugar’ has been long-listed for the 2020 Booker prize. The novel made it to the ‘Booker Dozen’ after judges assessed 162 novels, published in the UK  or Ireland between October2019 and September 2020. 

Burnt Sugar’  was earlier released in India under the title ‘Girl in White Cotton‘ to critical acclaim. The judges at the Booker panel called it an “‘utterly compelling read’ that examines a complex and unusual mother- daughter relationship with honest , unflinching realism” it is “emotionally wrenching but also cathartic, written with poignancy and memorability”. 

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Controversies over Awards: Et tu, Booker? 

This year both the Nobel and the Booker prizes have been surrounded by controversies. The Booker Prize announced two winners — Margaret Atwood for The Testaments and Bernardine Evaristo for Girl, Woman, Other.

While rulings had been made earlier to rule out the eventuality for such an occurrence , a CNN report says: “This will only be the third time that a dual award has been given. In fact, the award changed its rules in 1993 to clearly state that ‘the prize may not be divided or withheld’ after the second two-author win.”

The £50,000 will be shared by the two writers.

Public opinion expressed in tweets said: “My only booker take is that it is a shame that the first black woman to win has to share the glory” and “The Booker has simultaneously delegitimized its own worth and diminished the achievements of a woman of color with this rousing double win.” Read more

Seoul Book Fair completes 25 years

The Seoul International Book Fair, started in 1954, claims to be the biggest event of its kind in Korea with participation of forty countries and 430 publishers, including Hungary, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, USA, Egypt and Indonesia. The guest of honor this year, at its twenty-fifth anniversary, was from Hungary.  

Hungarian Ambassador to Korea Mozes Csoma said in his opening speech: “Back in 1892, the Austro-Hungarian Empire already signed a treaty of amity with the Joseon Dynasty. Hungarian scholar Barathosi Balogh Benedek traveled the Korean Peninsula in the early 20th century, and he hoped Hungarians would get to know more about Korea and Korean culture. Now I have a similar hope with his. I hope more Koreans get to know Hungarian culture and its literature.” Read more

South Korean writer Hang Kan Joins Artistes in Norway for a futuristic Journey

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South Korean writer, Hang Kan ,who was the winner of the Man International Booker prize in 2016 for her novel The Vegetarian, has joined the ranks of literary greats who are giving their writing for the Future Library Project in Norway started by artist Katie Paterson in 2014.

Katie Paterson, an award winning Scottish artist known to play with and find inspiration in nature using her imagination to create unique artworks based on natural phenomenons like glaciers,stars and the universe itself, planted one thousand spruce trees in the Nordmarka forest, just outside Oslo in Norway. The paper from these woods will be used in 2114 to print the books of the literary greats who are participating in the project, which include literary giants like Margaret Atwood and multiple award winning novelist David Mitchell and whose ranks Hang Sen joined last month. Read more

The top 10 Asian books of 2016, from vivid science fiction to Japanese crime, Vietnam war memories and today’s China

Former Hong Kong academic Madeleine Thien’s Booker shortlisted family saga, Hideo Yokoyama’s gripping tale of corruption in Japan and Mei Fong’s searing history of China’s one-child policy among our picks

By James Kidd

It was a vintage year for literature – particularly in Asia. South China Morning Post book critic James Kidd lists his top 10 books of the year by Asian writers, or about Asia itself.

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

Six decades of Chinese history are dramatised through music and politics, family and friendship, love and loss. Shortlisted for the Man Booker prize, here is one of the books of the year, by a former Hong Kong academic. Read more

Source: South China Morning Post

Indian Among 13 Authors Long-Listed for 2015 Booker

Indian author Anuradha Roy and British-Indian Sunjeev Sahota are among 13 international authors long-listed for the 2015 Man Booker Prize, the prestigious literary prize committee announced here today.

Roy has been picked for her third novel, ‘Sleeping on Jupiter’, and Sahota for ‘The Year of the Runaways’, the committee said.

“We had a great time choosing this list. Discussions weren’t always peaceful, but they were always very friendly,” said Michael Wood, chair of this year’s Man Booker judging panel.

“We were lucky in our companions and the submissions were extraordinary. The long-list could have been twice as long, but we’re more than happy with our final choice. Read more

New Salman Rushdie novel goes to Penguin Books India

Salman_RushdiePenguin Books India has acquired a new novel by Salman Rushdie, the publishing house announced today.

The novel titled,  Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, is a wonder tale about the way we live now, a rich and multifaceted work that blends history, mythology, and a timeless love story to bring alive a world – our world – that has been plunged into an age of unreason.  Inspired by 2,000 years of storytelling tradition yet rooted in the concerns of our present moment, it is a breath-taking achievement and an enduring testament to the power of the imagination.

Salman Rushdie is the author of eleven previous novels, including Midnight’s Children (awarded the Booker Prize in 1981, and the Best of the Booker Prize in 2008), Shame, The Satanic Verses, The Moor’s Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, Shalimar the Clown and The Enchantress of Florence, as well as a book of stories, East, West, and three works of non-fiction. His memoir, Joseph Anton, was published in 2012 and became an internationally acclaimed bestseller.  It was called “a harrowing, deeply felt and revealing document” by Michiko Kakutani in the New York Times and praised as “funny, moving and absolutely necessary to read” by Nicholas Shakespeare in the Daily Telegraph . His books have been translated into over forty languages.

Penguin Books India will publish Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights on their Hamish Hamilton imprint in September 2015.

Chiki Sarkar, Publisher at Penguin Books India, who acquired the novel from Andrew Wylie at The Wylie Agency, said: ‘A new novel by Salman Rushdie is always a major event – and this dazzling new work is one of his best yet. We are thrilled to be publishing it in  India.

DSC prize for South Asian literature shortlist sets stars against debut novelists

Pulitzer winner Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland is one of five finalists, alongside two fiction debuts, in contention for $50,000 award: The Guardian

From the story of a bomb blast in the heart of Karachi to a portrait of postwar Sri Lanka, the shortlist for the DSC prize for South Asian literature pits acclaimed authors including Kamila Shamsie and Jhumpa Lahiri against two debut novelists.

The $50,000 (£32,000) award is given to a writer of any nationality writing about South Asia and its people, with five writers on the shortlist this year.

Shamsie and Lahiri are joined on the 2015 DSC shortlist by Romesh Gunesekera, who was shortlisted for the Booker prize in 1994 for Reef, and for debuts from first-time novelists Bilal Tanweer and Shamsur Rahman Faruqi. Read more

Booker win saves Richard Flanagan from life down the mines

Australian author who pondered drastic career change sees sales soar £140,000 in a week after prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North: The Guardian

The Australian author Richard Flanagan, who was so short of money after completing his most recent novel that he contemplated working in north Australia’s mines, sold books worth nearly £140,000 in only seven days following last week’s Booker prize win.

Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, set on the Burma Death Railway, beat titles by authors including Ali Smith and Howard Jacobson to land the Man Booker on 14 October. Praised by chair of judges AC Grayling as “an absolutely superb novel, a really outstanding work of literature”, it sold 10,242 print copies in the UK in the week following the win, according to book sales monitor Nielsen BookScan – something of an increase on the previous week, when it sold 316 copies. Read more

Richard Flanagan, Booker prize winner and admirer of Hispanic literature

Richard Flanagan, the recent winner of the prestigious Booker prize, has expressed his admiration for Hispanic writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jorge Luis Borges and Roberto Bolaño, among others.

Flanagan, dubbed “Australia’s Ernest Hemingway” by filmmaker Baz Lurhmann for being immensely intellectual while retaining his sense of adventure, has voiced his passion for various Latin American authors in interviews and texts he has written. Read more

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