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South Korean writer, Hang Kan ,who was the winner of the Man International Booker prize in 2016 for her novel The Vegetarian, has joined the ranks of literary greats who are giving their writing for the Future Library Project in Norway started by artist Katie Paterson in 2014.

Katie Paterson, an award winning Scottish artist known to play with and find inspiration in nature using her imagination to create unique artworks based on natural phenomenons like glaciers,stars and the universe itself, planted one thousand spruce trees in the Nordmarka forest, just outside Oslo in Norway. The paper from these woods will be used in 2114 to print the books of the literary greats who are participating in the project, which include literary giants like Margaret Atwood and multiple award winning novelist David Mitchell and whose ranks Hang Sen joined last month.

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Indian author Anuradha Roy and British-Indian Sunjeev Sahota are among 13 international authors long-listed for the 2015 Man Booker Prize, the prestigious literary prize committee announced here today.

Roy has been picked for her third novel, ‘Sleeping on Jupiter’, and Sahota for ‘The Year of the Runaways’, the committee said.

“We had a great time choosing this list. Discussions weren’t always peaceful, but they were always very friendly,” said Michael Wood, chair of this year’s Man Booker judging panel.

“We were lucky in our companions and the submissions were extraordinary. The long-list could have been twice as long, but we’re more than happy with our final choice.

Pulitzer winner Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland is one of five finalists, alongside two fiction debuts, in contention for $50,000 award: The Guardian

From the story of a bomb blast in the heart of Karachi to a portrait of postwar Sri Lanka, the shortlist for the DSC prize for South Asian literature pits acclaimed authors including Kamila Shamsie and Jhumpa Lahiri against two debut novelists.

The $50,000 (£32,000) award is given to a writer of any nationality writing about South Asia and its people, with five writers on the shortlist this year.

Shamsie and Lahiri are joined on the 2015 DSC shortlist by Romesh Gunesekera, who was shortlisted for the Booker prize in 1994 for Reef, and for debuts from first-time novelists Bilal Tanweer and Shamsur Rahman Faruqi.

Australian author who pondered drastic career change sees sales soar £140,000 in a week after prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North: The Guardian

The Australian author Richard Flanagan, who was so short of money after completing his most recent novel that he contemplated working in north Australia’s mines, sold books worth nearly £140,000 in only seven days following last week’s Booker prize win.

Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, set on the Burma Death Railway, beat titles by authors including Ali Smith and Howard Jacobson to land the Man Booker on 14 October. Praised by chair of judges AC Grayling as “an absolutely superb novel, a really outstanding work of literature”, it sold 10,242 print copies in the UK in the week following the win, according to book sales monitor Nielsen BookScan – something of an increase on the previous week, when it sold 316 copies.

Richard Flanagan, the recent winner of the prestigious Booker prize, has expressed his admiration for Hispanic writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jorge Luis Borges and Roberto Bolaño, among others.

Flanagan, dubbed “Australia’s Ernest Hemingway” by filmmaker Baz Lurhmann for being immensely intellectual while retaining his sense of adventure, has voiced his passion for various Latin American authors in interviews and texts he has written.

Neel Mukherjee has delivered on the promise of his first novel. His second, The Lives of Others, currently long listed for the Booker Prize, is a tour de force, says Oindrila Mukherjee. 

the-lives-of-othersThe novel opens in a village in Bengal in May 1966 with the impoverished Nitai Das walking back to his hut from the landlord’s house where he begged all morning for a cup of rice. Unable to procure food or work and mired in debt, Nitai is driven to kill his wife and children before committing suicide. We then switch to the following year at 22/6 Basanta Bose Road, a four-storied house in Calcutta, where the Ghosh family resides.

The Ghoshes exhibit many characteristic features of affluent Bengali joint families in the sixties. Prafullanath, the ageing patriarch who built the family business, Charu Paper & Sons (Pvt. Ltd.) lives in the house with his three sons, Adinath, Priyo, and Bholanath, their respective families, the widow and children of his youngest son, and a retinue of servants including the old and trusted Madan. All the brothers are involved in the family business. The widow, Purba, and her children, are treated with contempt by most of the others and live in squalid conditions in their dark and dingy room downstairs. But the rest of them, for the most part, enjoy considerable material comfort and of course a reputation for being an established, “bonedi” family.