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8 Great Japanese Books in Translation That Aren’t by Haruki Murakami

We love Murakami, and all the cats, jazz, whiskey bars, mysterious women, and glimpses at modern Japanese life that populate his books. But there’s a world of magnificent novels out there by Japanese authors who don’t receive as much U.S. press for their work. If you’ve already devoured Murakami’s story collections (like Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman) and his acclaimed novels (including Kafka on the ShoreThe Wind-up Bird Chronicle, and IQ84), it’s time to add these contemporary Japanese books to your end-of-summer reading list. There’s something for everyone: mysteries and thrillers, teen horror, relationship dramas, and twisted, yakuza-related crime stories, all taking place in locales that may be unfamiliar to American readers. Each will get your imagination churning and your passport begging for stamps. Here’s a sample of our favorite modern books from the land of the rising sun.

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Science fiction’s new golden age in China, what it says about social evolution and the future, and the stories writers want world to see

By Rachel Cheung

The science-fiction genre in China was little known before Liu Cixin was honoured with the Hugo Award for best novel in 2015 for The Three-Body Problem. The first book in Liu’s Remembrance of Earth’s Past trilogy, it tells of an alien invasion during the Cultural Revolution and has sold more than a million copies in China alone. The English translation was recommended by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to members of his book club, and praised by former US president Barack Obama as “wildly imaginative, really interesting”.

Last year, Liu’s compatriot Hao Jingfang earned a Hugo Award for Folding Beijing, in which the city is divided into zones, each with a different number of hours in the day.

Liu has been nominated for another Hugo Award this year, for the final episode in his trilogy, Death’s End.

The two winning books are now being adapted for the big screen in China, marking a turning point for Chinese sci-fi and potentially expanding the genre’s exposure globally. Read more

Source: South China Morning Post


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Science fiction translator Ken Liu on Invisible Planets compilation

By Jarrod Watt

Hao Jinfang and Xia Jia both appear in the first English-language compilation of Chinese science, Invisible Planets. Ken Liu’s short story The Paper Menagerie was the first work of fiction to win the Nebula, Hugo and World Fantasy Worlds in one year.

Invisible Planets could well be the Chinese science fiction equivalent of Dangerous Visions, an anthology of science fiction released in 1967 which changed the way many readers thought about the genre.

“For readers, my fellow anglophonic readers, I hope they like the book. I don’t think the book is terribly important to the Chinese community, because Chinese writers have been writing Chinese science fiction for decades, and there’s a very vibrant science fiction scene in China, consisting of younger authors like Chen Quifan, Hao Jinfang, Xia Jia and so on…

“For English readers I think it is kind of interesting, because up until this moment Chinese science fiction has played a very low role for the average English reader, you know, most of us read authors from the UK, the US, Australia, from Canada, we might read some translations, but mostly they will be from Europe or Japan. There has not been a large presence in translation from Chinese quarters. Read more

Source: South China Morning Post


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The top 10 Asian books of 2016, from vivid science fiction to Japanese crime, Vietnam war memories and today’s China

Former Hong Kong academic Madeleine Thien’s Booker shortlisted family saga, Hideo Yokoyama’s gripping tale of corruption in Japan and Mei Fong’s searing history of China’s one-child policy among our picks

By James Kidd

It was a vintage year for literature – particularly in Asia. South China Morning Post book critic James Kidd lists his top 10 books of the year by Asian writers, or about Asia itself.

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

Six decades of Chinese history are dramatised through music and politics, family and friendship, love and loss. Shortlisted for the Man Booker prize, here is one of the books of the year, by a former Hong Kong academic. Read more

Source: South China Morning Post


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The Islamic roots of Science Fiction

The Islamic Roots Of Science Fiction

Top image: Cover detail of Hayy ibn Yaqdhan by Ibn Tufail

You probably already knew that Islam was having a scientific golden age during Europe’s middle ages, and making tons of scientific and medical discoveries. (Which is why we use words like “algebra.”) But you might not know that some of the earliest proto-science fiction came from the Islamic world.

Of course, Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein is widely recognized as the first real work of science fiction, because it’s a novel of speculation based on the scientific discoveries of her day. But there were a number of works before Frankenstein that feature a lot of what we’d consider the defining characteristics of SF.

The first of these is widely considered to be A True History by Lucian of Samosata, a Syrian author. This 2nd century novel follows a traveler who is transported via water spout to the Moon, where he encounters strange societies and bizarre life forms. But there are also a number of early claimants to the “proto science fiction” label coming out of the Islamic world. Notably: Continue reading