Tag Archives: Indian authors

Awards & Nominations – Prajwal Parajuly

Recently, Nepali-Indian origin author Prajwal Parajuly has been in the news for all the right reasons. His works have been nominated for some of the most prestigious literary awards in the globe.

Prajwal Parajuly (né Sharma) (born 24 October 1984) is an Indian author whose works focus on Nepali-speaking people and their culture. Parajuly grew up in the Gangtok, Sikkim region of northeastern India. His father is Indian and his mother Nepalese. He was educated at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri, and the University of Oxford. Before committing to a writing career, he worked as an advertising executive at The Village Voice. (Source)

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“Beauty and creativity coexisted with all the difficult realities of the city!” – Taran N Khan

Team Kitaab is in conversation with Taran N. Khan, the author of Shadow City (Published by Penguin India, 2020) where we discuss Kabul, her love for the city and her fascination for it which led to this book.

Taran N. Khan is a journalist and non-fiction writer based in Mumbai. Her writing has appeared in GuernicaAl JazeeraBerfroisHimal SouthasianGulf News and Dagsavisen, as well as in leading publications in India like The CaravanOpenThe Hindu and Scroll.in. She has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Logan Non-Fiction Program, Jan Michalski Foundation and Pro Helvetia. From 2006 to 2013, Khan spent long periods living and working in Kabul. Shadow City is her first book.

Taran N. Khan’s Shadow City is a fascinating read on Kabul. Interestingly, the first thing, Khan, was told when she reached Kabul, was to never venture for a walk. And that is exactly what she did- explore the city through walks, which further led to this book.

From “I have a complicated relationship with walking…” to writing a book on exploring an entire city through a series of walks. Has writing this book redefined walks/walking for her, we wondered. To which Khan says, “The book was shaped in part by this complicated relationship, which is still evolving. During the recent lockdown in Mumbai, for instance, I was not able to walk as often as I used to. When I did go out, it felt like a different terrain. Emptied of its crowds, the bare bones of the metropolis emerged, and I could see features that had always existed, but had been invisible to me.”

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New Releases from Asia – June 2020

Gone Away: An Indian Journal by Dom Moraes (with an introduction by Jerry Pinto)

Publisher: Speaking Tiger

Year of publication: 2020

Pages: 229

Price: INR 294 (E-book)

Book Blurb

One of the most unconventional travelogues ever written, Gone Away covers three months of Dom Moraes’ life spent in the subcontinent at the time of the Chinese incursions on the Tibetan border in 1959.  In that short time, a remarkable number of memorable things happened to him, some of them the sort of fantastic situations that could only enmesh a poet, perhaps only a young poet—a visit to a speak-easy in Bombay;  an interview with Nehru and an hour spent closeted with the Dalai Lama in Delhi; and a meeting with the great Nepalese poet, Devkota, whom he found already laid out to die by the side of the holy river Basumati. After a short stay in Calcutta, where he tried, with limited success, to investigate the lives of prostitutes, he went up to Sikkim, the north-eastern border state into which no visiting writer had been allowed for almost a year.

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Indian authors writing in English language

By Ankita Ghosh

While we were busy reading mostly American and European authors to satiate our hunger for novels written in the English language, a quiet and cautious breed of writers were steadily reinventing the idea of English language novels for us, here in the heartland of the subcontinent.

These writers came to be loosely known as ‘Indian authors writing in English language’. As the 21st century progressed and our desperate need to be readily anglicized was reversed by the chronic desire to be homebound, more and more people began reading them and soon they became a phenomenon.
These authors usually fall into two distinct categories. The first category of authors is headed by Chetan Bhagat, Ravinder Singh, Manju Kapur, Anuja Chauhan and the likes. They have equally been loved and loathed. The middle class that was reluctantly welcoming English into their households, loved them as they spoke of a transitioning India and wrote about its average citizens. Read more
Source: Meri News

India: Crossword enters cluttered publishing space

Leading organised bookseller Crossword Bookstores has entered the already cluttered publishing domain with The Write Place, which will focus only on Indian authors.

According to market research agency Nielsen, the domestic publishing market had as many as 9,000 publishers and over 21,000 book retailers in 2015.

On the move to enter the publishing platform, Crossword Bookstores chief executive Kinjal Shah said, “The Write Place is committed to publishing Indian authors.” Read more

Source: Business Standard

I’m outraged a media house doesn’t want to review Indian authors: Amrita Talwar

It seemed like a normal “Monday” working day.

I logged in and started trawling through my email. I came across a name marked in bold that I was dying to hear from. The email was from a journalist to whom I had pitched an author profile and I had been following up persistently for an answer. You know how publicists feel when they are desperately trying to pitch an Indian author for an interview and then suddenly a mail pops up on the screen. It’s the equivalent of finding a Rs 1,000 note in your jeans when you are absolutely broke.

I manage publicity for a reputed publishing house in India and my forte is promoting writings by Indian authors – novels, narrative non-fiction, commercial and literary. Finding media space for their work is something that I quite like doing. And I tell people happily and proudly that “shrinking” media space in India is a myth. I gloat to my UK counterparts that India is probably the only country that still has lavish Sunday pages dedicated to books, author interviews and websites that happily carry book-related stories. Read more

India: Regional authors set to come together for Gateway Litfest

In February, a one-of-its-kind literary festival will bring together regional language authors on one platform, to give vernacular writings the same recognition as Indian English literature.

Gateway Litfest, to be held at the National Centre for the Performing Arts on February 14 and 15, is an initiative by Mohan Kakanadan, editor of Mumbai-based Malayalam literary magazine, Kaakka.

“In its inaugural edition, the fest will focus on seven languages — Marathi, Malayalam, Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Tamil and Oriya. While Indian authors writing in English, and even in Hindi, have several popular national platforms, there is none for vernacular authors even as their contribution to Indian literature is immense,” said Kakanadan.

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DSC Prize for South Asian Literature: Jhumpa Lahiri’s ‘The Lowland’, Khaled Hosseini’s ‘And the Mountains Echoed’ among books in longlist

jhumpa_lahiri-620x412Four Indian authors including three poets are among ten writers longlisted for the US $50,000 DSC Prize for South Asian Literature. Popular novelists Khaled Hosseini and Jhumpa Lahiri have also made to the longlist for their books And the Mountains Echoed and The Lowland. Read more

Action-packed year for literature in India

Mohsin hamidIt was an action-packed 2013 for literature in India with some exciting titles, controversies and new faces grabbing their own slice of attention.

Indian authors continued to win prestigious awards and get shortlisted for them. Festivals were galore with Jaipur Literature festival leading the way. A number of high-profile authors like Jeffrey Archer, Mohsin Hamid and Aminatta Forna visited India.

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