India would seem to be the place to be if you are a publisher, according to figures revealed by Nielsen’s Andre Breedt in his swift overview of the global book market as the London Book Fair wrapped up last week.

Not only is the country ranked third on Nielsen’s intriguing Wheel of Global Consumer Confidence, just behind Indonesia and the Philippines, but when it comes to physical books the overall market was up 11% by volume and 23% by value in 2013 over 2012. In other parts of the world, many publishers would be happy just to take 1% up, thanks. Or even flat – yep, flat would be good.

What can the 10 South Korean writers selected for the book fair this week tell us about a country that has been cut in two? The Star

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After two years of political hot potatoes – first China and then Turkey – this year’s “market focus” country presents a different challenge to the London Book Fair, which runs this week: Who wants to read books from Korea? The choice of name could be dismissed as opportunistically misleading; Korea is two countries, but the 10 writers who will be at the book fair are all from the south.

Anthony-HorowitzAt last year’s Digital Minds conference, author Neil Gaiman encouraged publishers to “try everything,” advice that was echoed at this year’s event, as a morning of keynote speakers kicked off the London Book Fair by urging publishers to look beyond the book.

“I do not believe that books will ever die,” said Anthony Horowitz, author of the bestselling Alex Rider books, in his opening talk. “At the same time, we cannot deny we are in an extraordinary transition, and it does seem to me sometimes that publishers are not grabbing the nettle because they are too afraid of getting stung.”

While no single title has emerged as the hot book of this year’s London Book Fair, a number of titles were generating buzz as the fair kicked off on Tuesday.

One of the hottest of those titles is, arguably, a memoir represented by William Morris Endeavor’s Bill Clegg called Darling Days. Dan Halpern at Ecco acquired North American rights to the book in the States about a week before the fair in a deal insiders have said was worth $700,000.

Industry must do more than turn books into PDFs to capture readers’ imaginations, says head of trade body on opening day

The search for the next publishing sensation, and digital business model, dominated the agenda at the opening day of the annual London Book Fair on Tuesday.

The head of the industry trade body warned that simply “turning a book into a PDF” was not innovative enough to capture readers’ imaginations and sales. “In any sector, in any industry, stagnation is death. If you stand still, you are probably in danger because someone will come along and take your consumers from you,” said Richard Mollet, chief executive of the Publishers Association.