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Literature perhaps does not seem profitable to most. But what recent findings have shown is that reading good literature helps build attitudes that can lead to a better chance at success. Would you or would you not want to take on the challenge of a good book?

Carl Sagan, a legend in our times with his Pulitzer Prize winning Cosmos ( book and TV series), an iconic, successful figure who demystified science for mankind, relived the wonder of books and reading: “What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you…Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.” 

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One newcomer to the world of literary journals in Japan is an old hand at literature, and straddles both financial spheres, running a Japanese journal as a commercial enterprise with the English version supported by sponsorship. Motoyuki Shibata, a former University of Tokyo professor, has been translating for over 25 years. His first foray into literary journalism produced Monkey Business, a Japanese journal started in 2007.

In 2010, Shibata teamed up with Ted Goossen, a professor at York University, to create an English version featuring the best bits of the Japanese Monkey Business.