DSC00174(1)Let’s get down to brass tacks. Why do you write?

Clichéd but true: because I have to. Even if things had gone very differently for me (as they might easily have) and I had ended up working in a profession unrelated to writing, I suspect I would still have made notes, just for myself, in a little pad or on a blog every time I watched a film or read a book that stimulated me.

Tell us about your most recent book or writing project. What were you trying to say or achieve with it?

Oh, there are always many writing projects on hand – I think of even a 1000-word review or an 800-word column as a project that one has to devote serious thought and effort to. But my latest book, published in September 2015, is The World of Hrishikesh Mukherjee: The Filmmaker Everyone Loves – it is a critical study of the director’s work, which is widely categorised as “middle cinema” or “middle-class cinema”. I found myself wanting to write about him because I properly discovered these gentle films relatively late in my life, and found myself unexpectedly drawn to many of them – to the ways in which they made little observations about the workings of a society, couched in simple, comforting narratives.

Describe your writing aesthetic.

Sorry?

If China’s film market is a flame burning bright, the country’s online literature is increasingly itsfuel.

The world’s second-largest film market, with a box office haul of $6.8 billion in 2015, ischurning out top-grossing movies inspired by popular novels published online.

As the self-publishing phenomenon has shaken up the literary scene in the West, writers inChina have increasingly eschewed conventional publishing models and found readers on theinternet. Online-only publishers have sprung up, and their releases are proving hugelypopular.

Speaking at the ‘My Literature, My Film’ event, organized by National Book Trust at the 15{+t}{+h} North East Book Fair, Buddhadeb Dasgupta and Jahnu Barua, who are also very close friends, ended the centenary year of Indian cinema by urging youngsters to develop an interest in good literature and cinema. This, they said, will help them understand life and society better.

Hanif KureishiHanif Kureishi and Roger Michell on Le Week-End: ‘We find each other very annoying’: The Telegraph

Roger Michell and Hanif Kureishi – both British and in their late fifties, but seemingly as different as could be – have maintained a close working relationship for the past two decades. Michell, a director whosefilms include Notting Hill and Changing Lanes, and Kureishi, the novelist who also wrote the screenplay for My Beautiful Laundrette, stay constantly in touch, and every so often make a film that is unmistakably their own.

Their first collaboration was in 1993, when they adapted Kureishi’s first novel for television, The Buddha of Suburbia, a semi-autobiographical account of a teenager with a British mother and a Pakistani father, growing up in south London and yearning for a life in the theatre.