Tag Archives: Ruskin Bond

New Releases from Asia: July 2020

 

The Four Colors by Ankur

 

  • Publisher: Hawakal Publishers
  • Year of publication: 2020
  • Pages: 88
  • Price: INR 350 / USD 8.99

Book Blurb

The fifty-odd poems in this collection all reflect the different hues of life as well as different stages of growth of a person. The poems find themselves divided naturally into four sections: Green (birth), Yellow (disillusion), Purple (rebirth), and Red (self-realization). The irrepressible current of life, in its various manifestations, runs through them all. Read more

How Animalia Indica echoes voices from past and present with Sumana Roy

Book Review by Namrata

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Title: Animalia Indica –The Finest Animal Stories in Indian Literature

 Editor: Sumana Roy

Publisher: Aleph Book Company (2019)

Edited by Sumana Roy, Animalia Indica is a first of its kind collection of animal stories in Indian literature. From classic story tellers like R.K.Narayan, Premchand, Rudyard Kipling to the most recent maestros like Kanishk Tharoor, Perumal Murugan, and Nilanjana Roy, this collection features them all.

Sumana Roy is a Siliguri based author whose previous works include a non-fiction title (How I became a tree), a fiction novel (Missing) and a poetry collection (Out of Syllabus). She went on to win the Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize and the Tata Literature Live! First Book Award in 2017 for her debut book How I became a tree.

This anthology, with its beautiful cover, has twenty-one stories about humans and animals. It can easily be called a collector’s edition with the who’s who of Indian literature featured within. Not all of the collection is made of short stories. There are some poems; excerpts; two are novellas and one is an entire novel in its own. The selection is classic! It includes stories translated from regional languages and from Indian writing in English, with interesting end-notes about the narrative, authors and translators.  The magic of the stories makes something written in 1981 an equally intriguing read as one written recently. What makes the book even more eye catching and unique, are the sketches by Rohan Dahotre before each story (he has also done the stunning cover). Depicting the animal/s featured in each story, these black and white sketches set the tone for every tale that follows. Read more

How Ruskin Bond reveals his love for India: “All I really wanted was my little room back again”

Book Review by Richa Mohan

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Title: Lone Fox Dancing, My Autobiography

Author: Ruskin Bond

Publisher and date of publication: Speaking Tiger, 2017

Ruskin Bond is an award-winning author. He won the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize in 1957, for his very first novel, The Room on the Roof. Since then he has been honoured with various awards including the Sahitya Akademi Award for English writing in India in 1993, the Padma Shri in 1999, and the Delhi government’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He was conferred with the Padma Bhushan in 2014. In fact, his autobiography, Lone Fox Dancing, won the 2017 Atta Galatta-Bangalore Literature Festival Book Prize.

So how do you review the work of a master? Actually, you don’t. You simply flow with the magic of the master weaver of tales and feel lucky that you had a chance to, once again, experience the power of beautiful storytelling.

It is said greatness is born of suffering, and the story in the book is testament of that. You are transported to a simpler time and life, such that you actually end up yearning for them — for the days when pen and paper, and tales in the night, were an everyday reality. Read more

Memories of the father: Book review of Ruskin Bond’s Looking For The Rainbow

bondIt is almost customary for Ruskin Bond to surprise his readers with a subtle reference to his childhood. The readers on the other hand – having devoured most of his works – tend to assume they know all about the life and time of this timeless writer. But every time you think you know all there is to know about the writer, who has been writing for well over six decades now, there is some new bit of trivia that he surprises you with.

The elegance with which he does so is perhaps what keeps us intrigued. What do we already know about Bond’s early days? That he did not have a very happy childhood, that his parents were separated and that he was often lonely. But one splendid year from Bond’s life escaped the public eye and his new book ‘Looking For The Rainbow’ that releases on his 83rd birthday on May 19, lays bare the sheer joy that the then eight-year-old boy experienced living with his father. Read more

Source: Hindustan Times

Dear Independent Bookstores, Thank You For Everything!

By Tanu Shree Singh

The year: 1985

The place: Delhi.

The occasion: Nani gave some pocket money to two grand-kids who were now itching to go to the nearby market and splurge.

I remember the excitement. I remember the trip to the market. I remember us being in a hurry to step out of the car, and I remember the towering bookshelves. I definitely remember the smell of books, the glossy, new ones that the fat pocket money could buy, and I remember the bliss. Trips to bookstores were few and far between, mostly because we stayed far away and splurging was not an option. But those few trips to those tiny bookstores tucked away in inconspicuous corners are etched in our hearts forever.

The year: 2015

The place: Leh

The occasion: Nothing. The younger one spotted a bookstore.

“Can I go in, please?”

All I could do is smile.

We entered the tiny bookstore that also doubled as a stationery shop. The younger one ran his hands over some books, took some out, flipped a few pages, and when no one was looking drew a deep breath in. I caught him, and sheepish, understanding grins were exchanged.

When we stepped outside, he smiled and whispered, “I find bookstores calming, and reassuring. Sort of addictive — one can never pass one by without going in, no?” Read more
Source: Huffington Post

Publishers say 2017 World Book Fair a profitable affair

As the New Delhi World Book Fair comes to a close today, the nine-day long event was an “excellent” experience with leading publishing houses making significant profit on sales compared to previous years. Vimal Kumar, General Manager at Speaking Tiger said they had “unexpected sales”, despite facing several technical glitches in the aftermath of demonetisation.

“Due to demonetisation we faced several problems since many a times card machines didn’t work due to lack of signals. But, it has been an excellent experience, rather unexpected sales for Speaking Tiger. Our sales have almost doubled this year,” he said.

Some of the top sellers at the stall included ‘Himalaya: Adventures, Meditations, Life’ edited by Ruskin Bond and Namita Gokhale, and ‘Murderer in Mahim’ by Jerry Pinto among others.

For Penguin India, which saw a hike of nearly 20 per cent in business from last year’s fair, the event being moved ahead by a month from the usual February, has worked favourably. Read more

Source: The Financial Express

India: The Great Indian Film and Literature Festival begins on Dec 2 in Gurgaon

Film and literature greats including Ruskin Bond, Prakash Jha, Subhash Ghai and Piyush Mishra among others, will come together under one roof at an upcoming festival here to “promote the diversity of varied cultures”.

The Great Indian Film and Literature Festival (GIFLIF), which begins on December 2 and will be held at DLF Cyber Hub here, aims to showcase the vernacular spirit of Indian film and literature.

New Release: Death Under The Deodars: The Adventures of Miss Ripley-Bean by Ruskin Bond

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In a brand-new collection of stories set in the 1960s -70s Mussoorie of a bygone era, renowned author Ruskin Bond brings to life a mystery and murder featuring the elderly Miss Ripley-Bean and her friends. The book titled, Death Under The Deodars: The Adventures of Miss Ripley-Bean is published by Penguin India.

The eight stories in the book are classic Ruskin style – full of wit and memorable characters, and will enthrall and delight children as well as adults. As the elderly Miss Ripley-Bean, her Tibetan terrier Fluff, her good friend Mr Lobo, the hotel pianist, and Nandu, the owner of the Royal, mull over the curious murders, the reader will be enthralled and delighted – until the murderer is finally revealed.

About the Author 

Ruskin Bond’s first novel The Room on the Roof was written when he was seventeen. He received the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize in 1957. Since then he has published a number of novellas, short story collections, books of essays and articles, poems and children’s books. He received the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1993, the Padma Shri in 1999 and the Padma Bhushan in 2014. Ruskin Bond was born in Kasauli, and grew up in Jamnagar, Dehradun, Delhi and Shimla. As a young man, he spent four years in the Channel Islands and London. He returned to India in 1955.

He currently resides in Landour, Mussoorie with his adopted family.

 

 

 

Author Ruskin Bond calls literature Nobel for Bob Dylan ‘wrong decision’

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Eminent writer Ruskin Bond said the decision to award the Nobel Prize for Literature to singer-poet Bob Dylan was “not a right one” and is an “insult” to all the great writers who have received the award so far.

“Dylan is a successful musician and a great entertainer, but I am not sure whether he was given the award in the right category,” Bond said during a conversation organised as part of ‘River Talks — the North East Literary Festival’ here.

Dylan is not really a writer and awarding the prize to him in the literature category is a “great insult to all the writers who have already received the award and also to those who rightly deserve it”, the author said. Read more

Celebrating the small joys of life: Review of ‘A Gathering of Friends’ and ‘Upon an Old Wall Dreaming’ by Ruskin Bond

by Deepika Srivastava

bondRuskin Bond is an author whose career spans five decades, whose stories have captivated children and adults alike. Marked by lucidity and perceptual clarity, his stories celebrate the travels and travails of the common man; the protagonist is the common man. A Gathering of Friends and Upon an Old Wall Dreaming (both by Aleph, India, 2016) contain a set of carefully chosen stories that sum up the different phases of his entire career. For a first-time reader, it’s the best introduction to the highly acclaimed author, and for a seasoned one, it’s the best recipe for nostalgia.

Geographically displaced, the Anglo-Indian author found refuge in the Garhwal hills of Uttrakhand. These hills form the setting in most of his stories. The familiarity of the other settings used — like the railway station, Delhi, the villages — engage the reader on an emotional level, allowing him to establish a deeper relationship with the prose; the familiarity of the setting creates a familiarity of experience. This is one of the prime reasons as to why his stories hold up so well today. They deal with broken hearts, being alone, living in penury, about strangers who turn out be angels, the flowers which blossom — experiences that almost everyone goes through in their lifetime — encouraging the reader to relish the joy in these little things, because happiness can be found in them too.

A Gathering of Friends opens with “Rusty Plays Holi” from his first book, The Room on the Roof. While most fiction thrives on plot, here it is the character who leaves an imprint. In “The Blue Umbrella”, one instantly falls for the girl Binya when she leaves the umbrella for the greedy shopkeeper without his knowledge. In “The Night Train at Deoli”, one’s heart is filled with sympathy for the author, and while reading “The Woman on Platform 8”, one wishes to go back in time and meet such an angelic stranger, Sushila the girl of his dreams, who reminds us of our lost love. Read more

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