If you’ve got an author website, you know how important it is to have great text for it—but it’s not going to hold anyone’s attention if you’ve just got a wall of words on your home page! It’s important to have eye-catching images to go along with your text. Here are the five elements that make for great pictures on your site:

Most importantly, the pictures you include must have a good reason for being there. Make sure they’re relevant to the topic being discussed in your text and that they add something to the overall meaning of it. That means no dancing babies (unless your text is about annoying, overdone animations from the mid-to-late ’90s). The bottom line is: Don’t choose an image just because it’s fun, amusing, or shocking; make sure it works for your visual branding.

Writing a book is not enough. You also need to promote it. Here is a list of bloggers/writers who interview authors. This is a global list.

Eri Nelson: Wonderful Reads of the Month – http://www.wonderfulreadofthemonth.blogspot.com/

Teddy Gross on Jewish-themed books – http://bit.ly/GEhQR8

Jon Bloch: http://www.jonpbloch.com/interviews.html

Sylvia Browder: http://bit.ly/z0nKjQ

Paper Dragon Ink: http://bit.ly/vZpdXG

Kris Wampler: http://bit.ly/ymaBEw

Morgen Bailey: http://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/blog-interviews/

Sylvia Ramsey: http://www.thoughtfulreflections.blogspot.com

Kate Brauning writes excellent book reviews: http://katebrauning.wordpress.com/

crastaAmong the bunch of famous Indian novelists and writers, Richard Crasta‘s name might not be as widely recognized as that of a Seth or a Rushdie, but few would come close to him in being funny, witty, satirical and daring–all at the same time. If you don’t believe me, I can get American legendary novelist Kurt Vonnegut to  vouch for him who found his first novel, The Revised Kama Sutra, “very funny”.  After Khushwant Singh (who is 90 plus old but still active as a below the belt heavy hitter), if any Indian writer has pushed the boundaries of satirical writing, with dollops of sexual humour (and satirical writing on a lot of other serious stuff) in his own distinctive style, it’s Richard. But, in fairness, his writing is more than that, and multifaceted, covering areas as wide as, in his own words, “autobiography, humor, satire, political critique, sexual critique, and literary criticism.”