Leave a comment

The little boy who decided to write (and publish!) his own book

Many a child has amused parents with fantastical (sometimes non-sensical!) stories dreamed up in a way only a toddler could manage, and surely many have also “written” books with a few drawings or scribbles on paper. Rishav Gupta (now age 8), took things a bit further.

“I want my own storybook!” Rishav told his mother Srinanda, an early years teacher at Chatsworth International School, when he was just 3.

At this stage he wasn’t writing, though he’d demonstrated a love of storybooks and a keenness for drawing.

“It all started with doodling,” Srinanda recalls. “Pay attention to the doodles: every scratch can have a story behind it if you just ask. Every curvy line can have a story.” If I wasn’t a teacher I might not have known that, but as a teacher you have an awareness that it’s something truly authentic worth paying attention to. Read more

Source: Sassy Mama


Leave a comment

Have you written a children’s story inspired by Asia?

The Scholastic Asian Book Award (Saba) is a joint initiative between the National Book Development Council of Singapore and publishers Scholastic Asia that “will recognise children’s writers of Asian origin who are taking the experiences of life, spirit, and thinking in different parts of Asia to the world at large”.

Since its inception in 2011, the biennial award has been responsible for publishing English language works by authors from all over Asia, including India, Hong Kong, and Singapore.

The best manuscript wins S$10,000 (RM31,000) and will be considered by Scholastic Asia for publication; the authors of the first and second runners-up manuscripts will be offered advice by Scholastic Asia on editing and submitting their works for publication. Read more

Source: Star2.com


Leave a comment

New Release: Dreamagination by Rishav Gupta

dream-bk-cover

When Srinanda Gupta was reading stories to her 6-month-old son, little did she know then that this boy would be an author at the age of eight.

Srinanda fondly recalls the day Rishav walked up to her with his drawings and said he wanted a “real” book.

“I clearly remember how happy and confused I was at the same time because I did not quite understand what he meant. After a conversation, Rishav made it clear that he actually wanted to be an author,” says the mother who also teaches at Chatsworth International School in Singapore.  She decided to nurture his passion and give him time to become responsible for his own initiative. Rishav named the book The Lion’s Walk. Each page focused on a place and some detail that he observed of that particular place.

“He narrated the story while I documented it. What was unique was how Rishav read books, made connections with his personal experiences and applied his knowledge in his writing. I got the pages printed and stitched together,” shares Srinanda. That was Rishav’s first book!

Now this Grade 2 student of Chatsworth International School, Singapore, has a book to his credit Dreamagination, published by Kitaab International.

dremagination

The book is a collection of 10 stories written by Rishav between the age of 3 and 7. Dreamagination is more than a book. It is a writing journey of a young boy from doodling, to drawing and then consolidating his ideas in writing.

“This is a big wish come true! You must dream and when the dream becomes bigger, bigger and bigger, it comes true. I want to encourage everyone around the world to write because it helps people to communicate and you can express your heart full of stories. You need dreamagination to live,” says Rishav.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

And they read happily ever after

By Sravasti Datta

Children do bury their noses in books, in fact much more than adults. The author speaks with writers who affirm this.

Enter a swanky book store and try looking for children’s books, and you will probably find a handful in a forgotten corner. But, there is a wealth of children’s writing by Indian authors waiting to be discovered. Authors, editors, and illustrators invested in children’s books are doing all they can to reach out to the young minds and get them interested in reading. But the refrain, ‘Children don’t read’, gives the impression that children’s books don’t sell.

Ask Shreya Rao, a class 10 student at A.P.S., Bengaluru, who also writes a blog and she is quick to point out: “People who say children don’t read, don’t even read themselves.” She says that her love for reading began when she was in class four. “My mother gave me a book to read and said she would buy as many toys as I wanted if I finished reading it. I loved the book so much that I wanted to read more.” Read more

Source: The Hindu

 


Leave a comment

India: Why a Marathi childhood is incomplete without Madhuri Purandare’s books

By Pooja Pillai

madhuri-purandare

Madhuri Purandare is rarely to be found among children. The writer and illustrator has a “long distance” relationship with her readership. “It’s not as if I maintain this distance deliberately,” says the 64-year-old. And it has not made a difference to her work. Purandare is one of the most successful writers for children in Marathi literature, and has had her works translated into English, Urdu, Kannada, Assamese, Telugu and Hindi. Besides notable works like Babachya Mishya, Radhach Ghar and Chitravachan, the Pune-based writer also conceived and edited Vaachu Anande, an anthology for children that juxtaposes classics of Marathi literature with iconic artwork from across India. For her contributions to children’s literature, she won the Sahitya Akademi’s Bal Sahitya Puraskar in 2014, and more recently, the first Big Little Book Award instituted by Parag, an initiative of the Tata Trusts.

As is evident from her stories, Purandare sees children as they really are: individuals with strong likes and dislikes, who do not like being talked down to and who are not universally adorable. “Her stories have a sense of rhythm and flow. They are very visual as well, making it easy for even struggling readers to comprehend,” says Shubhada Joshi, founder of the Pune-based alternative school Khelghar, which uses Purandare’s books in its reading programmes. Joshi says, “Every story takes you into a child’s world, shows you how she perceives the world. Her writing creates opportunities for children to ask questions and think independently. Her work also gives parents and teachers an insight into a child’s imagination.” Read more

Source: The Indian Express


Leave a comment

India: The Hindu Young World-Goodbooks Awards 2017 will be announced on January 16, 2017 during The Hindu Lit for life

The Hindu Young World-Goodbooks Awards is for children’s books published in India. It was introduced to promote excellence in children’s writing and illustration. The award aims to acknowledge innovative publishing trends, and recognise children’s literature as an independent and important field.

This is the second year the award will be given and the winners will be felicitated at The Hindu Lit for Life festival which will take place in Chennai on January 14, 15 and 16. This year, the awards will be given in two categories — Best Author and Best Illustrator. Each award will carry a cash prize of Rs. 50,000, a trophy and a citation. Read more

Source: The Hindu


Leave a comment

New Release: Death Under The Deodars: The Adventures of Miss Ripley-Bean by Ruskin Bond

death-under-the-deodars

In a brand-new collection of stories set in the 1960s -70s Mussoorie of a bygone era, renowned author Ruskin Bond brings to life a mystery and murder featuring the elderly Miss Ripley-Bean and her friends. The book titled, Death Under The Deodars: The Adventures of Miss Ripley-Bean is published by Penguin India.

The eight stories in the book are classic Ruskin style – full of wit and memorable characters, and will enthrall and delight children as well as adults. As the elderly Miss Ripley-Bean, her Tibetan terrier Fluff, her good friend Mr Lobo, the hotel pianist, and Nandu, the owner of the Royal, mull over the curious murders, the reader will be enthralled and delighted – until the murderer is finally revealed.

About the Author 

Ruskin Bond’s first novel The Room on the Roof was written when he was seventeen. He received the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize in 1957. Since then he has published a number of novellas, short story collections, books of essays and articles, poems and children’s books. He received the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1993, the Padma Shri in 1999 and the Padma Bhushan in 2014. Ruskin Bond was born in Kasauli, and grew up in Jamnagar, Dehradun, Delhi and Shimla. As a young man, he spent four years in the Channel Islands and London. He returned to India in 1955.

He currently resides in Landour, Mussoorie with his adopted family.

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Literary powerhouses you need to read

Be it bizarrely imaginative, utopian, or even real-life stories, you are what you read. Here’s a round-up of ten authors that every teen must read

The books we read influence our thoughts, decisions and values.

Choosing the right book in your teens is an important step in the journey of exploring books as well as understanding life a little better.

There are classics, which have been influential in the early 1900s and will continue to do so for years to come.

On the other hand, there are books, which are on their way to making history.

PG Wodehouse

“I always advise people never to give advice.”

– PG Wodehouse

If wit and humour are what you are looking for then nobody can beat PG Wodehouse. The feather-brained ‘Bertie Wooster’, the amazing valet ‘Jeeves’ and the verbally dexterous ‘Psmith’, have gained an iconic status in the literary world. Wodehouse captures the humorous side of life in his books. His notable works are Right Ho Jeeves, Thank you Jeeves, Laughing gas, and The code of the Woosters. Read more


Leave a comment

Book review: Ramayana For Children by Arshia Sattar

ramayan-for-children

Thirty decades after her translation of Valmiki’s Ramayan, Arshia Sattar retells this epic for children. The Ramayan obviously never gets old. This past weekend, when I took the sumptuously illustrated book of many rakshasas home, my eight-year-old’s eyes gleamed; it was then beyond argument who would have first dibs on it.

Sattar, according to the publisher’s description, remains true to Valmiki’s version of this variously interpreted text. It’s interesting then that Lakshmana is shown in a much better light in the story than his elder brother. Read more


Leave a comment

The Lounge Chair Interview: 10 Questions with Payal Dhar

By Monideepa Sahu

payal-dhar

Let’s get down to brass tacks. Why do you write?

This is a deceptively difficult question. I’ve thought about it for days, wondering how to answer it without sounding hackneyed. (And does the fact that I don’t have a deep, clever answer mean I have no good reason to be writing?!) The main reason is I write, I suppose, is because I like it. There are the beginnings of all these stories inside my head and the only to find out what happens next is to write them down and see where they go. This process of a story unfolding and then coming together is very exciting. It’s almost as much fun as reading a book.

Tell us about your most recent book or writing project. What were you trying to say or achieve with it?

I have a few works in progress at the moment. One of them is a fantasy novel I’ve been stuck on for more than half a decade. Some people say I should abandon it, but I feel it has a life still. Another falls somewhere between a school story and mystery story, and also between MG and YA. The third is a standalone YA fantasy where we find out that a deja vu is actually a time jump (!); and the fourth is a secret!

Describe your writing aesthetic.

I like to keep it simple. The best writing advice I got was from a journalism teacher who told us that the kind of writing we should be aiming for was “Famous Five” (of Enid Blyton fame). At that time I thought that was ridiculous — why should you write like you’re writing for ten-year-olds? Only later I realized the wisdom behind that thought. That rather than showing off how many big words you know, write so that even a child could understand it. And it is harder than it looks, even when you *are* writing for children.

Continue reading